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Cornucopia of products awaits buyers at Northampton marijuana dispensary

  • The recreational side of NETA waiting to start business.

  • Amanda Rositano, direct of Organizational Compliance explains how things will work at NETA, when the recreational side opens.

  • Jacob Moriarty, a trainer at NETA, takes out the pre rolled variety while has five different kinds of joints in the one pack while explaining about some of the items that will be sold on the recreational side of NETA when they open.

  • Jacob Moriarty, a trainer at NETA, takes out the pre rolled variety while has five different kinds of joints in the one pack while explaining about some of the items that will be sold on the recreational side of NETA when they open.

  • Jacob Moriarty, a trainer at NETA, holds a Lumens, basically a gummy candy containing THC, while he explains some of the items that will be sold on the recreational side of NETA when they open.

  • Jacob Moriarty, a trainer at NETA, talks about the cooking oil containing THC while explaining some of the items that will be sold on the recreational side of NETA when they open.

  • Jacob Moriarty, a trainer at NETA, talks about the cooking oil containing THC while explaining some of the items that will be sold on the recreational side of NETA when they open.

  • Jacob Moriarty, a trainer at New England Treatment Access, explains some of the items that will be sold on the recreational side of NETA.

  • Jacob Moriarty, a trainer at NETA, explains how the chocolate bar containing THC is wrapped in a child proof wrapper while explaining some of the items that will be sold on the recreational side of NETA when they open.

  • Jacob Moriarty, a trainer at NETA, talks about the flower that will be one item sold on the recreational side of NETA when they open.

  • Jacob Moriarty, a trainer at NETA, explains how the chocolate bar containing THC is marked with doses and will be one of the items that will be sold on the recreational side of NETA when they open.

  • Jacob Moriarty, a trainer at NETA, talks about the flower that will be one item sold on the recreational side of NETA when they open.



Staff Writer
Monday, November 19, 2018

NORTHAMPTON — As New England Treatment Access becomes one of the first businesses to legally sell recreational marijuana in the East, what can consumers expect to buy when they walk in the Conz Street store on Tuesday?

There will be marijuana flower and pre-rolled joints of course, but also gummies and chocolate with THC, marijuana infused oils and lotions.

“We try to have a product for everybody,” Jake Moriarty, who is employed as a trainer at NETA, said.

NETA has already been open since 2015 as a medical marijuana dispensary, and NETA representatives have repeatedly stressed that the main focus of the Northampton business will still be on medical marijuana patients.

“Anything that we do starts from the perspective of, ‘how do we preserve this experience for our patients’ while building a great experience for others as well,” said Amanda Rositano, director of operational compliance for NETA.

Moriarty, who is also a medical marijuana patient, uses medical marijuana to deal with the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder that stem from his time in the U.S. military. While he has helped other medical marijuana patients find the products that they need as a trainer, on Tuesday, he will also help recreational marijuana patients find the products they desire.

All of the products sold on the recreational side are also available on the medical side. Employees will be shared between the two sides as well, although patients and recreational customers will use separate counters and lines.

Rositano also said that there will be no lines on Tuesday for medical patients.

“We don’t have lines today. We won’t have lines for Tuesday,” she said.

One of the products Moriarty recently displayed for the Gazette is Jack Frost flower, a sativa-dominant hybrid strain of marijuana. Moriarty said that while marijuana products have different effects on different people, Jack Frost gives him an uplift in the morning with no anxiety.

Another marijuana product that people will be able to purchase is Elevation Oil, a marijuana-infused grapeseed oil that can be used in cooking. Moriarty said that he personally likes to throw it on bacon in the morning.

“Definitely get your day started,” Moriarty said, noting that it’s also useful for those with dietary restrictions who aren’t able to consume other edibles.

Another product that will be available Tuesday is Allay Lotion, which Moriarty said that most people don’t report psychoactive effects from.

“They can really get the pain relief they’re looking for and still go about their day,” he said.

The D Line Bar, a marijuana distillate and Belgian chocolate bar that is 90 milligrams and divided into 4.5 milligram servings, is another offering.

“A little better than your average Hershey bar,” Moriarty said.

The bar is encased in child-resistant packaging, and information identifying it as a marijuana product is imprinted on each serving.

Moriarty says that when eating edibles, one should go “low and slow,” opting for one serving of a D Line Bar and waiting a couple of hours for it to take effect.

Another available edible is strawberry gummies, which have a noticeable strawberry aroma.

Some products available on the medical side aren’t available on the recreational side. One of these products is a Dose Bar, whose serving sizes are beyond the 5-milligram limit per serving mandated by the commonwealth.

Why buy from NETA?

Asked about why people should buy from NETA and not the black or gray marijuana market, Moriarty noted that all of NETA’s products are third party tested. He also said that NETA provides expertise for its customers as well.

“If you have questions we’re here to guide you through the process,” said Moriarty, who also described the product as “top of the line.”

One product that Moriarty didn’t recommend for people who are new to marijuana is shatter, a brittle glassy marijuana concentrate that is very potent.

People buying marijuana at NETA will be able to purchase up to one ounce of marijuana per purchase, up to 5 grams of marijuana concentrate, or a combination of both. NETA has a points system to track how much marijuana a customer is purchasing, with customers capped at 100 points per purchase.

There will be limits on the amount of certain products a customer can purchase, so that the store doesn’t run out, with flower sales limited to an eighth of an ounce at first.

Customers and patients can also reserve their orders online at NETA’s website or by using its “reserve ahead” app. They will be able to pay with cash, credit or debit cards, although only credit cards with four-digit pins will be accepted.

Consumers will need to show government-issued identification to enter the stores, regardless of how old they are or look.

The other location in Massachusetts that will begin selling recreational marijuana Tuesday is Cultivate Holdings LLC in Leicester.

Official sanction

On Monday, Cannabis Control Commission Chairman Steven Hoffman and Executive Director Shawn Collins stopped by NETA for a tour of the facility with media.

“I’m impressed,” Hoffman said. “It looks like a very professionally run establishment.”

However, he said he wasn’t surprised by this, as NETA has been the subject of multiple inspections. Nevertheless, Hoffman did note that the opening process could have been halted had he seen something not in line with the regulations.

“We’re not done with our job once we issue a license,” he said, saying that the commission’s task is to make sure a facility stays in compliance. “We could have seen something today and we would have taken action.”

The first person who will be buying a marijuana product at NETA will be none other than Northampton Mayor David Narkewicz. Narkewicz said he plans to purchase a marijuana-infused chocolate bar.

“That seems like the most straightforward,” he said.

Narkewicz, who is not a marijuana user, said the purchase will be a historic one.

“I actually don’t plan on consuming it,” he said.

Instead, Narkewicz said that he will likely have it displayed in his office, and may pass the edible on to Historic Northampton.

“It’s of significant historic value,” he said.

Narkewicz also said he has not consumed a marijuana edible in his life.

“Not to my knowledge,” the mayor said.

Bera Dunau can be reached at bdunau@gazettenet.com.