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River science

  • Standing in the waters of the Fort River, students of Amherst Regional eighth-grade science teacher Norman Price, lower right, read portions of the conclusion of Charles Darwin's "Origin of Species" before a hands-on study of macroinvertebrate river life in Groff Park last week. A few yards downstream, math teacher Saurav Rana lead other eighth-graders in measuring stream flow dynamics. The students were participating in a three-day program funded by the Amherst Education Foundation.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Standing in the waters of the Fort River, students of Amherst Regional eighth-grade science teacher Norman Price, lower right, read portions of the conclusion of Charles Darwin's "Origin of Species" before a hands-on study of macroinvertebrate river life in Groff Park last week. A few yards downstream, math teacher Saurav Rana lead other eighth-graders in measuring stream flow dynamics. The students were participating in a three-day program funded by the Amherst Education Foundation.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Students in Amherst Regional Middle School's eighth grade "Metacomet" team take to the Fort River in Groff Park on Friday to measure stream flow dynamics with math teacher Saurav Rana, third from left. A few yards upstream, science teacher Norman Price was leading another group in an up-close study of macroinvertebrate river life. The students spent three days last week on the Connecticut River tributary studying its physical properties in an interdisciplinary curriculum developed with a $12,000 grant from the Amherst Education Foundation. The previous week, seventh-graders spent three days studying the ecology of the water body. For a look at the curriculum visit www.riverscienceinaction.org.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Students in Amherst Regional Middle School's eighth grade "Metacomet" team take to the Fort River in Groff Park on Friday to measure stream flow dynamics with math teacher Saurav Rana, third from left. A few yards upstream, science teacher Norman Price was leading another group in an up-close study of macroinvertebrate river life. The students spent three days last week on the Connecticut River tributary studying its physical properties in an interdisciplinary curriculum developed with a $12,000 grant from the Amherst Education Foundation. The previous week, seventh-graders spent three days studying the ecology of the water body. For a look at the curriculum visit www.riverscienceinaction.org.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Students in Amherst Regional Middle School's eighth grade "Metacomet" team took to the Fort River in Groff Park last week to study macroinvertebrate river life and stream flow dynamics. Here, students of science teacher Norman Price, standing in water at right, prepare to read aloud a selection from Charles Darwin's conclusion in "Origin of Species" before gathering samples from the stream. The students were participating in a three-day program funded by the Amherst Education Foundation.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Students in Amherst Regional Middle School's eighth grade "Metacomet" team took to the Fort River in Groff Park last week to study macroinvertebrate river life and stream flow dynamics. Here, students of science teacher Norman Price, standing in water at right, prepare to read aloud a selection from Charles Darwin's conclusion in "Origin of Species" before gathering samples from the stream. The students were participating in a three-day program funded by the Amherst Education Foundation.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Standing in the waters of the Fort River, students of Amherst Regional eighth-grade science teacher Norman Price, lower right, read portions of the conclusion of Charles Darwin's "Origin of Species" before a hands-on study of macroinvertebrate river life in Groff Park last week. A few yards downstream, math teacher Saurav Rana lead other eighth-graders in measuring stream flow dynamics. The students were participating in a three-day program funded by the Amherst Education Foundation.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Students in Amherst Regional Middle School's eighth grade "Metacomet" team take to the Fort River in Groff Park on Friday to measure stream flow dynamics with math teacher Saurav Rana, third from left. A few yards upstream, science teacher Norman Price was leading another group in an up-close study of macroinvertebrate river life. The students spent three days last week on the Connecticut River tributary studying its physical properties in an interdisciplinary curriculum developed with a $12,000 grant from the Amherst Education Foundation. The previous week, seventh-graders spent three days studying the ecology of the water body. For a look at the curriculum visit www.riverscienceinaction.org.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Students in Amherst Regional Middle School's eighth grade "Metacomet" team took to the Fort River in Groff Park last week to study macroinvertebrate river life and stream flow dynamics. Here, students of science teacher Norman Price, standing in water at right, prepare to read aloud a selection from Charles Darwin's conclusion in "Origin of Species" before gathering samples from the stream. The students were participating in a three-day program funded by the Amherst Education Foundation.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
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