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Track Record

  • This CD cover image released by Concord Jazz shows, "Money Jungle: Provocative in Blue," by Terri Lyne Carrington. (AP Photo/Concord Jazz)

    This CD cover image released by Concord Jazz shows, "Money Jungle: Provocative in Blue," by Terri Lyne Carrington. (AP Photo/Concord Jazz) Purchase photo reprints »

  • This CD cover image released by Warp Records shows "Vinyl," by Jamie Lidell. (AP Photo/Warp Records)

    This CD cover image released by Warp Records shows "Vinyl," by Jamie Lidell. (AP Photo/Warp Records) Purchase photo reprints »

  • This CD cover image released by Matador Records shows "You're Nothing," by Iceage. (AP Photo/Matador Records)

    This CD cover image released by Matador Records shows "You're Nothing," by Iceage. (AP Photo/Matador Records) Purchase photo reprints »

  • This CD cover image released by Blue Note Records shows "Without a Net," by Wayne Shorter. (AP Photo/Blue Note Records_

    This CD cover image released by Blue Note Records shows "Without a Net," by Wayne Shorter. (AP Photo/Blue Note Records_ Purchase photo reprints »

  • This CD cover image released by Concord Jazz shows, "Money Jungle: Provocative in Blue," by Terri Lyne Carrington. (AP Photo/Concord Jazz)

    This CD cover image released by Concord Jazz shows, "Money Jungle: Provocative in Blue," by Terri Lyne Carrington. (AP Photo/Concord Jazz) Purchase photo reprints »

  • This CD cover image released by Concord Jazz shows, "Money Jungle: Provocative in Blue," by Terri Lyne Carrington. (AP Photo/Concord Jazz)
  • This CD cover image released by Warp Records shows "Vinyl," by Jamie Lidell. (AP Photo/Warp Records)
  • This CD cover image released by Matador Records shows "You're Nothing," by Iceage. (AP Photo/Matador Records)
  • This CD cover image released by Blue Note Records shows "Without a Net," by Wayne Shorter. (AP Photo/Blue Note Records_
  • This CD cover image released by Concord Jazz shows, "Money Jungle: Provocative in Blue," by Terri Lyne Carrington. (AP Photo/Concord Jazz)

Jamie Lidell

Jamie Lidell

Warp Records, $9.99

British-born Jamie Lidell may have relocated to Nashville, Tenn., but his new album is anything but country.

His fifth full-length release — self-produced in his home studio — is an 11-track homage to the funkadelic days of 1970s and 1980s disco pop. Think Cameo and The Gap Band.

“I’m Selfish” is bouncy with vocals resembling Prince and additional synth, while “What a Shame” enters dubstep territory with its booming beat and catchy chorus.

The tune “why-ya-why,” with its happy trumpets and uneven beats, oddly turns into a Skream & Benga effort halfway through. It’s a heavily produced sonic assault — and that’s not necessarily a good thing.

The album has loads going on, and at times you’re almost begging for a timeout. Thankfully there’s “Don’t You Love Me,” a mellowish, D’Angelo-esque love song, and it saves the day.

You’re Nothing

Iceage

Matador Records, $9.99

The second album from the four Danish lads known as Iceage is an even more caustic slab of brooding punk than their blindsiding first record. “You’re Nothing” rails against excess, manufactured pressure and the general decimation of morality.

Alternating between urgent calls to act (“Coalition”) and a bruised motivation (“Wounded Hearts”), these songs devolve and instruments claw for space, fueling the unbridled frenzy. On the raging “Burning Hand,” Elias Bender Ronnenfelt loses his throat asking pointed rhetorical questions with such aplomb. It’s like he’s in on a good joke. The chorus of “Rodfaestet” — sung in their native tongue — is as close as they get to sing-along territory.

A few moments jump out: The immediate pummel of the percussion that opens “It Might Hit First,” the reflective intervals (“In Haze”) reminiscent of debut standout “Remember” and the unhinged repeating of the title that closes out the album.

Without a Net

The Wayne Shorter Quartet

Blue Note, $11.88

Saxophonist Wayne Shorter ranks among jazz’s greatest composers, but when his quartet performs live — as on this album — his compositions are mere frameworks for daring improvisations that take off in unexpected directions without a safety net. His acoustic quartet includes three leaders in their own right — pianist Danilo Perez, bassist John Patitucci and drummer Brian Blade — who’ve developed an almost telepathic interplay after 12 years together.

On “Without a Net,” his first Blue Note recording in 43 years, the 79-year-old Shorter remakes two earlier compositions, “Orbits,” written for the Miles Davis Quintet, and “Plaza Real,” created for his jazz-fusion band Weather Report. “Flying Down to Rio,” from the 1933 film that first paired Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, is transformed into a harmonically complex, other worldly exploration.

There are six new Shorter compositions, ranging from the hypnotically melodic “Starry Night” to the 23-minute chamber jazz, tone poem, “Pegasus,” performed with The Imani Winds quintet that walks a tightrope between written and improvised music.

Money Jungle: Provocative In Blue

Terri Lyne Carrington

Concord Jazz, $14.19

Producer Terri Lyne Carrington follows up her Grammy-winning, all-female “The Mosaic Project” by offering a fresh take on the classic trio recording “Money Jungle” — the session released 50 years ago that teamed pianist Duke Ellington, bassist Charles Mingus and drummer Max Roach.

Some of the strongest tracks — such as “Wig Wise,” which includes Brazilian rhythms and Mideastern motifs, and Clayton’s ballad “Cut Off” that references Ellington’s “Solitude” — spotlight the trio of drummer Carrington, pianist Gerald Clayton and bassist Christian McBride. And Carrington enhances “Fleurette Africain” with ex-Ellingtonian trumpeter Clark Terry’s scat/spoken-word vocals and “Backward Country Boy Blues” with Nir Felder’s earthy slide guitar intro and Lizz Wright’s wordless vocals.

The hard-swinging “Money Jungle” includes sound clips on the state of capitalism from Martin Luther King Jr., Bill and Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, while the mellow “Rem Blues/Music” has Shea Rose reciting a poem comparing music to a seductive woman and Herbie Hancock quoting Ellington’s observations on the clash between jazz creativity and commerce.

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