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Keeping Tabs on the Arts

  • Photographs by Braden Chattman are on view at Cooley Dickinson Hospital.

    Photographs by Braden Chattman are on view at Cooley Dickinson Hospital. Purchase photo reprints »

  • COURTESY OF THE HOSMER GALLERY<br/>A photograph of the interior of Abbe de Silvacane Church and other photos by Paul Hetzel are on view at the Hosmer Gallery in Northampton.

    COURTESY OF THE HOSMER GALLERY
    A photograph of the interior of Abbe de Silvacane Church and other photos by Paul Hetzel are on view at the Hosmer Gallery in Northampton. Purchase photo reprints »

  • PHOTO COURTESY OF THE UMASS DEPT. OF MUSIC AND DANCE<br/>Composer Juhi Bansal

    PHOTO COURTESY OF THE UMASS DEPT. OF MUSIC AND DANCE
    Composer Juhi Bansal Purchase photo reprints »

  • COURTESY OF AUGUSTA SAVAGE GALLERY<br/>Works by Kabu MBII are on view at the Augusta Savage Gallery at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

    COURTESY OF AUGUSTA SAVAGE GALLERY
    Works by Kabu MBII are on view at the Augusta Savage Gallery at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Purchase photo reprints »

  • Photographs by Braden Chattman are on view at Cooley Dickinson Hospital.
  • COURTESY OF THE HOSMER GALLERY<br/>A photograph of the interior of Abbe de Silvacane Church and other photos by Paul Hetzel are on view at the Hosmer Gallery in Northampton.
  • PHOTO COURTESY OF THE UMASS DEPT. OF MUSIC AND DANCE<br/>Composer Juhi Bansal
  • COURTESY OF AUGUSTA SAVAGE GALLERY<br/>Works by Kabu MBII are on view at the Augusta Savage Gallery at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

At CDH

Two exhibits will open Thursday with a reception from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the hall galleries at Cooley Dickinson Hospital, 30 Locust St., Northampton. They will remain on view through Sept. 30.

In the Locust Gallery: “Local Landscapes in Oil” by Charles Fisher.

For more than 50 years, Fisher, of Southampton, has been a dealer of early-American furniture, paintings and decorative objects. He began painting in 2009, and has since had numerous shows.

In the New Gallery: “An Exploration of Time, Fact, and Imagination: The Changing World of Landscape Photography” by Michael Zide and Braden Chattman.

For 30 years, Zide’s work has been featured both internationally and in galleries from New York City to Los Angeles. Portfolios of his work have appeared in magazines like Silvershotz, Black and White, Today’s Photographer, Fotomagazine and Photo/Design.

Chattman is the head of the digital imaging department at the Hallmark Institute of Photography. He got his start in New York City working as a visual artists, graphic designer and retoucher. The work Chattman is exhibiting is concerned with the compression of time.

Prize art

“A Prize Every Time!” a collaborative exhibit by Sally Curcio, Amy Johnquest and Anne LaPrade Seuthe, opens with a reception Friday from 5 to 8 p.m. and will remain on view through Sept. 29 at the A.P.E. Gallery, 126 Main St. in Northampton.

On the surface, the exhibit suggests a carnival theme, but at its heart it addresses the anxiety that is a consequence of the state of our local, national and global economies.

“Gambling and games infiltrate our culture at many levels,” the creators wrote in an artists’ statement. “Attitudes about wealth vary wildly, but are often based on how it is acquired.”

“A Prize Every Time!” includes works that directly reference carnival and lottery games of chance. A collaborative piece called “Scratch Ticket to Paradise” is built of unscratched lottery tickets. To create the piece, the artists sold shares that were purchased by members of the community. Those shareholders are entitled to winnings, if any.

Another piece involves a wall of 36 painted panels, covered by balloons. The balloons will be popped at the reception to reveal a message.

Gallery hours are Tuesdays through Thursdays from noon to 5 p.m.; Fridays from noon to 8 p.m.; and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. The gallery is closed Mondays.

For information, visit www.aprizeeverytime.wordpress.com or call 586-5553.

At Augusta Savage

“The Why of Things: The Art of Kabu MBII,” will open with a reception Sunday from 5 to 7 p.m. and will remain on view through Sept. 27 at the Augusta Savage Gallery at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Born in Los Angeles in 1948, Kabu MBII’s dramatic paintings find their core influences in some of the most urgent moments of civil unrest in the United States: the threat of atomic war with it’s air raid sirens and weekly bomb drills in school, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War and draft card burners, activist groups like the Black Panthers, the Nation of Islam and the Symbionese Liberation Army.

Much like a reporter, this painter, draftsman and sculptor chronicles events onto his canvases. Most important, as he witnesses these moments, through his work, he poses the question: Why?

He says in an artist’s statement, “My art is about giving you a new way of seeing everyday events that we have normalized and rationalized or forgotten. I do this through light and shadow, reverberating color, juxtaposed perspectives and multitudinous layers of paint that vociferate from the canvas. Thematically, there are no holds barred. Architecture, infrastructure, technology, military equipment, chain link and barbed wire fence, debris fields, rubble, demolition sites and war zones take on a new meaning.” For information, call 545-5177.

At Hosmer Gallery

An exhibit by Paul Hetzel, Tristan Chambers and Rick Miller comprising images in the powerful, emotive compositional qualities of black-and-white photography, will have an opening reception Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m., and will remain on view through Sept. 30 at the Hosmer Gallery of the Forbes Library, 20 West St., Northampton.

Hetzel’s photos include images taken in a Cistercian Abbey in Southern France. He says he favors creating images in black and white because it allows him to best reproduce the mood, texture and form of the landscape, structure, or people in the images he captures. In 2013, his photographs were selected as best in show at the Monson Arts Festival and at the New England Camera Club Annual Convention.

Chambers’ photographs explore the interplay between agriculture, industry and nature in rural and postindustrial settings. In his photos, he pays attention to the temporal decay, as well as the evolution of plants, animals and man-made things. He uses tradition and contemporary techniques to produce prints from unalloyed materials: carbon pigment on cotton paper.

Miller’s photos will feature people, cityscapes and culture in Cuba. He says he’s trying to change the cultural mystery of Cuban culture, unknown to many citizens since the commercial, economic and financial embargo the United States placed on Cuba in 1960.

Miller was a freelance news and editorial photographer for many years prior to becoming a full-time art professor at St. Joseph’s College. Two of the many photographic projects he has exhibited locally and nationally are photographs of Cuba and “Facing AIDS: Photographic Portraits from Long Island.” He is the recipient of numerous grants and awards, including a grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council in 2008 for his ongoing project, “Facing Time: Portraits and Stories of Franklin County Seniors.” Miller’s book, “Cuba: Photographs by Rick Miller,” was published in 2009.

Gallery hours are Mondays and Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1 to 5 p.m.; and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For information, call 587-1011, ext. 4529.

Street festival

The Mattoon Street Arts Festival in Springfield will feature works by these local artists: woodworker Peter Lincoln, photographer Elsa Vitols, painter/photographer Deborah O’Neill, quilter Aviv Sieber, water colorist Mark Sieber and artists Debra and John Dunphy, all of Northampton; visual artist Stacy Geryk and jeweler Sheryl Machat, both of Easthampton; fabric worker Fran Beattie and glassworker Mickey Malinowski, both of Williamsburg; and glassworker Katie Richardson of Hadley.

Mattoon Street is lined with restored brick Victorian row houses in Springfield’s first historic district. It is also the oldest arts-and-crafts show in western Massachusetts, according to organizers.

The fair runs Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For information, call 736-0629 or visit www.mattoonfestival.org.

Grant applications

The Easthampton Cultural Council is accepting grant applications for programming in the arts, humanities and interpretive sciences that reflect upon “Old and New.”

Each year the council selects a theme to stimulate new and interesting projects in Easthampton. “Old and New refers to projects that interpret the “old” (mills, farms, history) in new ways and in new settings.

Projects must occur in 2014 and priority will be given to proposals that demonstrate collaboration among community members and organizations.

There will be a free grant workshop Monday from 6 to 8 p.m. at Flywheel Arts Collective, 43 Main St., Easthampton.

For information, visit www.mass-culture.org/Easthampton.

Kubrick classics

Select films by director Stanley Kubrick will be screened on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m., through Oct. 1, at Amherst Cinema, 28 Amity St., Amherst.

Kubrick’s command of the artistic process allowed him to master multiple genres. Many of his films were met with mixed popular and critical response, but almost all went on to win multiple nominations and awards.

Here’s the lineup:

Sept. 8, 10: “Dr. Strangelove or: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb,” a Cold War satire about America on the verge of nuclear war. Stars Peter Sellers, who juggles three roles.

Sept. 15, 17: “2001: A Space Odyssey,” a daring science fiction landmark that studies the interaction of humanity and technology.

Sept. 22, 25: “Lolita,” an adaptation of Vladmir Nabokov’s darkly comic novel about a middle-aged man’s obsession with a teenage girl.

Sept. 29, Oct. 1: “A Clockwork Orange,” a film set in a dystopian future tells the story of the attempted reconditioning of teenage gang leader Alex (Malcolm McDowell)

For information, visit www.amherstcinema.org or call 253-2547.

Music at UMass

The third Five College Music Festival, hosted by the University of Massachusetts Amherst Department of Music and Dance will be held Friday through Sunday in the Bezanson Recital Hall at UMass’s Fine Arts Center, 151 Presidents Drive.

The free festival showcases nearly 50 performers and composers who are primarily current and former faculty, select students from UMass and Smith College in Northampton, and members of the community.

Here’s the lineup: Friday includes a Five College Composers Concert beginning at 7:30 p.m. The set features Dan Warner’s “The Butterfly Effect”; David Sanford’s “Grace Canticles”; and Kate Soper’s “Only the Words Themselves Mean What They Say,” among other pieces.

Saturday at 2 p.m., a Heritage Concert features the winner of the Five College Composers’ Competition, Juhi Bansal, and her piece “The Lost Country of Sight.” It also includes new violin duos by Manuel Sosa, John Halle, Lewis Spratlan, Edward Jacobs and Donald Wheelock, and new four-hand piano duos by Daniel Felsendfeld, Richard Einhorn and James Matheson. Additional concerts begin at 4 p.m., featuring Charles Bestor’s “Piccolo Concerto for Trumpet and Electronics” and at 7:30 p.m., Bruce MacCombie’s “Anecdotes for Woodwind Quintet.”

Sunday at 3 p.m., a Horizons Concert features Pierre Boulez’s “Derive 1”; Augusta Read Thomas’ “Pilgrim soul”; Arnold Francetti’s “Settimino”; and Kaiji Saariaaho’s “Cendres.” There will be a pre-concert talk by David Schneider at 2 p.m.

Free parking for the event is in Lot 62. For information, call 545-0018.

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