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Editorial: We salute the Sox, making up for lost times

  • Boston Red Sox's David Price holds the championship trophy after Game 5 of baseball's World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Red Sox won 5-1 to win the series 4 game to 1. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip) David J. Phillip

  • Boston Red Sox's David Price holds the championship trophy after Game 5 of baseball's World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. The Red Sox won 5-1 to win the series 4 game to 1. AP PHOTO/David J. Phillip



Monday, November 05, 2018

It has been a week since the Boston Red Sox won their fourth World Series championship since the turn of the century.

How sweet it is to see the celebration continue.

The hometown team has opened the 2000s much the same way it did the 1900s, and we are all lucky to witness the good times. For far too long, good seasons ended in despair.

The Red Sox were kings in 1903, 1912, 1915, 1916 and 1918. That final year turned into a chant long used by Yankee fans to torture their rivals from the north.

For 86 years, the Sox failed. They came close four times. Who can forget the ’46 Series against the Cardinals. Ted Williams, the greatest hitter in MLB history, failed at the plate. Shortstop Johnny Pesky held the ball too long, and St. Louis won in seven games.

Next up was the “Impossible Dream” in 1967. Yaz, Carl Yastrzemski, won the Triple Crown, but the Sox couldn’t beat Bob Gibson, who won three games for the Cardinals in the seven-game series.

The talented Red Sox of ’75 ran into the Big Red Machine of the Cincinnati Reds. Jim Rice, Fred Lynn, Carlton Fisk, Dwight Evans, Luis Tiant and Bill “Spaceman” Lee were denied in seven games.

In 1986, a ground ball got by first base, and the sting still hurts nearly 20 years later.

The Sox of 2004 changed everything. The taste of success has led to more success, and for the last 14 years the Red Sox have made up for lost times.

Each championship has meant something different.

The first erased 86 years of doubt and frustration. The road to that title went through New York in historic fashion, down three games to none, a rally galvanizing a nation and flipping the script against the Yankees. They won again in 2007, a remarkable turnaround for a vastly different team, albeit stars David Ortiz, Manny Ramirez and Jason Varitek, and a utility player named Alex Cora.

The Red Sox of the 2000s were not without fault. In 2011, they blew a nine-game division lead in September and missed the playoffs. In 2012, the team was managed by Bobby Valentine and finished dead last.

The 2013, the Red Sox shared a purpose. The bombings at the Boston Marathon brought the team and city together. The Sox went from worst to first in the division, and a World Series championship unified the city.

This season was special. Unlike a majority of previous Red Sox champions, this year’s stars were homegrown. Andrew Benintendi, Mookie Betts, Xander Bogaerts, Jackie Bradley Jr. and Rafael Devers were followed by fans from Portland to Boston.

This team was two years in the making after two American League East titles were met with playoff exits. Boston brought in Cora to manage and J.D. Martinez to bring his big bat. Betts blossomed into an MVP candidate. A team-record 108 wins followed. David Price brushed off his playoff failures, and the team rolled through the 100-win Yankees, 103-win Astros and Dodgers for the championship.

The team is young, has the taste of success and could contend for the next few years.

We salute the Red Sox on the damage done, and we celebrate alongside the fans after another banner year.