Myrna Maloney Flynn, Mike McCaulley, Rev. Francis ReillyROE Act proposed in Mass. is more extreme abortion legislation

Published: 6/3/2019 9:30:25 PM

Google “extreme abortion,” and you’ll find hundreds of stories written since January, when New York passed its Reproductive Health Act and, ever the trendsetter, led the rest of the country into what has indisputably become the year of abortion.

Progressive legislation followed in Virginia and Vermont, disheartening pro-life advocates, who watched life-devaluing initiatives increase in both number and speed down the slippery slope Roe vs. Wade established.

Concurrently, abortion rights supporters lament “extreme” laws recently passed in Georgia, Alabama, and Missouri that drastically limit abortion.

Massachusetts hosts the next race to extremes, as legislators consider Senate bill 1209, the so-called “ROE Act” (Remove Obstacles and Expand Abortion Access). Since our current abortion laws are among the nation’s most permissive, there is no adjective that better describes S.1209 than “extreme.”

A few of the bill’s irrational provisions: It eliminates the parental consent requirement. No adult (except perhaps an adult impregnator) need be involved before a pregnant 13-year-old walks into an abortion facility.

It eliminates the requirement that abortions after the first trimester be performed in hospitals. It refuses legal protection to a child who survives an abortion attempt, enabling passive infanticide. It makes outlawing any abortion procedure, no matter how gruesome (such as partial-birth abortion), impossible in Massachusetts.

There is no logical reason to support this bill, unless, of course, you’re in the abortion business. As written, it does not help women; it endangers them. It does not protect our girls; it irresponsibly leaves them exposed.

For infant girls, it means an even worse fate. You will be responsible for these human rights assaults, since S.1209 also increases taxpayer funding of abortion.

Extreme should not be met with extreme. Both “sides” must move toward the center, examine each other’s valid concerns, and acknowledge truths both inconvenient and uncomfortable. Read S.1209. Learn what will be lost when the word “strikes” is used. Understand how it would impact the lives of those around you. Then act.

Tell Northampton resident and state Sen. Jo Comerford, chair of the Joint Committee on Public Health, that we do not need more extreme.

Myrna Maloney Flynn

Northampton

Mike McCaulley

Hatfield

Rev. Francis Reilly

Northampton


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