Alleged Easthampton pipe bomber compared to Boston Marathon bomber

  • Nelson Michael Lacaprucia is arraigned in Franklin County Superior Court Monday afternoon. Recorder Staff/Paul Franz

  • Assistant District Attorney Matthew Thomas, court appointed attorney Jonah Goldsmith and his client Nelson Michael Lacaprucia who was arraigned in Franklin County Superior Court on possession of explosives and possession of a bomb Monday afternoon. Recorder Staff/Paul Franz

  • Nelson Michael Lacaprucia is arraigned in Franklin County Superior Court on Possession of Explosives and Possession of a Bomb Monday afternoon. June 18, 2018 Recorder Staff/Paul Franz

  • Court appointed attorney Jonah Goldsmith, left, and his client Nelson Michael Lacaprucia who was arraigned in Franklin County Superior Court on Possession of Explosives and Possession of a Bomb Monday afternoon. June 18, 2018 Recorder Staff/Paul Franz

For the Gazette
Published: 6/18/2018 11:37:29 PM

GREENFIELD — An Easthampton resident accused of leaving a homemade pipe bomb at his east Deerfield workplace in March was arraigned in Franklin County Superior Court Monday and will continue to be held while waiting a week to learn whether a dangerousness hearing will be required.

Judge Daniel Ford pushed the conversation back a week to June 25 after hearing from the attorney representing Nelson Michael Lacaprucia, who argued that a dangerousness hearing was not relevant, while the prosecution from the Northwestern district attorney’s office cited the Boston Marathon bomber case as to why Lacaprucia, 46, should be held without bail.

Lacaprucia, who was employed by Trew Stone Inc., pleaded not guilty to the charges of possession of explosives and possession of a bomb. He has been held without bail since April after District Court Judge William F. Mazanec III ruled that he was considered a danger to the public.

Mazanec’s ruling during a dangerousness hearing came after Lacaprucia’s arrest and arraignment in Greenfield District Court.

On March 28, local police called for the Massachusetts State Police bomb squad around 8 a.m. after a supervisor found in the quarry an item that appeared to be a pipe bomb in Lacaprucia’s work area, according to the police report. Earlier that morning, Lacaprucia sent a text message to his supervisor stating he was taking a personal day.

Agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives were also at the scene.

The pipe bomb was found by state troopers to be made with low-grade explosive powder and “a complete firing train capable of initiation.” Components for other devices were also found nearby. The device had nails and metal pointed plates strapped to the exterior of the explosive device, according to Deerfield Police. Lacaprucia told police he built it “to see what it could do when it exploded underwater.” A search of his car found a fuse wire similar to the one attached to the device.

Lacaprucia arrived at the courtroom Monday afternoon in handcuffs, wearing a black T-shirt and a freshly groomed beard.

His attorney, Jonah Goldsmith of Northampton, tried to prevent the dangerousness hearing, which was already scheduled for Monday, June 25. He argued the law does not specifically address a bomb of this kind, although “the item is admittedly a dangerous one.”

Assistant District Attorney Matthew Thomas refuted this claim, citing the Boston Marathon bomber case as more relevant and pertinent.

“There’s no such thing as an unloaded bomb,” Thomas said.

The judge decided he needed more time to prepare for this argument. Also, Ford said he expects to establish a timeline of dates for the case.




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