Art Maker: Laurieanne Wysocki | Painter, assemblage artist. woodworker

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

  • Artist Laurieanne Wysocki on Wednesday at her home studio in Shutesbury. DAN LITTLE

Published: 3/31/2016 12:18:22 PM

Laurieanne Wysocki creates paintings and mixed media art in her Lake Wyola studio in Shutesbury. She lived for many years in New York City, where she exhibited in solo and group shows. She has traveled the world, both independently and as a tour director for Road Scholar educational programs, and has been to more than 80 countries on six continents. She says her cultural impressions are often reflected in her work.

“Seeing the world and experiencing different cultures has enriched my life in so many ways, not least, finding the inspiration to express these influences in my paintings,” Wysocki says. “For an artist, color plays a big part. From the softly faded mosaic stones in ancient ruins to the brilliantly colored stained glass windows in Europe’s medieval churches, I am fascinated by the colors of the world: Pompeii red, Saharan yellow ochre, Turkish indigo blue, Syrian stone gray, the sharp white of an Arctic glacier all have a place on my palette.”

Wysocki’s work is in private collections in western Massachusetts, Boston, New York, San Francisco and London; and in the Erarta Museum and Galleries of Contemporary Art in St. Petersburg, Russia.

Hampshire Life: Describe the work you are doing now.

Laurieanne Wysocki: Primarily I make paintings, often in triptych form, usually abstract. I’m attracted to rich, vibrant colors and texture, both of which I attain by applying alternating layers of paint and acrylic mediums to canvas and wood. Lately I’ve been learning how to weld so my more recent work includes assemblages made out of rusted metal and discarded objects. I run a pretty mean hot glue gun.

H.L.: What is your creative process like? 

L.W.: I usually begin by applying flexible modeling paste or wet stucco to the substrate and as it dries, I manipulate the surface using palette knives, stencils, wood blocks, anything that will make an interesting impression. After that, I apply color washes and mediums to build up the texture. Many of my paintings have added rusted metals and other elements of mixed media to create a more dramatic dimension.

H.L.: How do you know you're on the right track?

L.W.: When time disappears. Abstract expressionism can be transcendental. When I am fully engaged in a wall-size painting, I am operating on a deep personal level and not concerned with anything else. A relationship develops between me and the canvas as I respond quickly to what is happening. It’s about making choices and following through. The direction may change but as long as I continue to approach the work with an open mind, allowing my intuition to guide me, I will discover harmony within the composition.

H.L.: How do you know when a work is done?

L.W.: It’s never done. There can always be something to add or change. It’s more about letting go. When I can walk by a painting and it doesn’t beg for attention, then I’ll move on.

H.L.: What did you do today that relates to your art?

L.W.: I covered the paintings that will be in my next show in a clear coat to protect them from ultraviolet degradation from the sun.

— Kathleen Mellen

“Pentimento,” an exhibit of paintings and assemblages by Wysocki, will open with a reception during Amherst ArtWalk April 7 from 5 to 8 p.m. and will remain on view through April 30 at Hope & Feathers Framing and Gallery, 319 Main St. in Amherst. There will also be an artist's reception April 9 from 4:30 to 8 p.m. For information about the exhibit, visit hopeandfeathersframing.com. For information about Wysocki’s work, visit www.lawysocki.com.




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