CHART With new contract, UMass men’s basketball coach Derek Kellogg highest paid state employee



Last modified: Tuesday, November 04, 2014

AMHERST — In a new contract released by the University of Massachusetts Friday, Minuteman men’s basketball coach Derek Kellogg will become the highest-paid state employee in Massachusetts.

Kellogg is guaranteed make $994,500 a year through the 2018-19 season, an amount that could increase if he reaches bonuses based on performances by players on the court and in the classroom.

Kellogg, who was hired in 2008, renegotiated his first contract prior to the 2012-13 season. That deal, which brought his compensation to over $800,000 with performance bonuses, was scheduled to run through the 2016-17 season. The new deal replaces the final three seasons of the previous contract and adds two more.

“We are extremely pleased with the job Derek has done in his time here and feel the program is in a good place,” UMass Athletic Director John McCutcheon said in a statement released by the school. “He has built a solid foundation for the future. We felt it was appropriate to put something together that the university and he are both comfortable with in terms of the extension to keep him here for a long time.”

Kellogg was pleased to have the deal completed.

“I think it’s fantastic. I’m really happy personally and professionally. I think it solidifies our program for the long haul which is something I wanted to do when I came back,” said Kellogg, 41, a 1995 graduate of UMass. “I always wanted to make UMass one of the best jobs out there, a place that isn’t a stopover. I think we’ve done that with the new practice facility and the way we travel and the way the university has become one of the top universities in the country. My family is happy here. I’m really looking forward to this year and getting things underway.”



Kellogg will receive performance reviews after 2014-15 and if he receives a grade of satisfactory or higher, he’ll have a year added to the contract at the same salary terms. There will be another review after 2015-16 with the same potential benefit.

Kellogg is 109-86 in six seasons at UMass and has averaged 23.3 wins over the last three seasons. He led the Minutemen to the 2014 NCAA tournament, the school’s first appearance since 1998.

With his newly inked contract, Kellogg surpasses Michael F. Collins, the chancellor of the UMass medical school, who had been identified as the state’s highest-paid employee in 2011, 2012 and 2013, according to a Boston Globe article. Collins earned $816,602 in 2013.

According to USA Today, Kellogg was paid $843,667 in 2013-14, of which $761,358 was paid by UMass.

While Kellogg’s contract puts him at the top of the heap of state employees, that’s not the case when it comes to other coaches. Of the schools in the 2014 NCAA tournament, Kellogg ranked 40th in compensation. Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski was first making $9,682,032. Kellogg’s new total would move him up to 36th, making him the highest-paid coach earning less than $1 million. Ten of the 68 schools didn’t release their data to USA Today.

According to a Deadspin article from 2013, in 40 states, the highest paid employee was a football or basketball coach. Of those 40, 27 were football coaches, 12 were men’s basketball coaches, while Connecticut’s highest state employee is women’s basketball coach Geno Auriemma.

Kellogg’s base salary is $281,000 for the remainder of 2014, but drops to $225,500 beginning on Jan. 1, 2015. But he’ll also receive $769,000 in “other compensation” for making appearances on behalf of the athletic department.

According to the Massachusetts state employee salary database 2014, UMass Chancellor Kumble Subaswammy’s salary is $388,239.

Among the perks Kellogg is eligible for:

∎ $75,000 for any season in which UMass makes the NCAA tournament and $25,000 for each win in the tournament;

∎ $15,000 for winning 20 regular season games;

∎ $25,000 for winning 23 or more regular season games;

∎ $20,000 for finishing in the top three in the conference standings;

∎ $20,000 for winning the conference championship;

∎ Up to $40,000 for finishing with a strong ranking in the ratings percentage index, a computer formula that measures a team’s success based on strength of schedule. He’d get $10,000 for finishing in the top 50; $20,000 for top 35; $30,000 for top 25 and $40,000 for top 15;

∎ Up to $40,000 for strong schedule strength — $40,000 for top 20; $30,000 for top 40 and $20,000 for top 60;

∎ Up to $25,000 for a strong home attendance — $25,000 for averaging 8,000-plus, $20,000 for 7,000-7999; $15,000 for 6,000-6,999;

∎ $15,000 for winning conference coach of year;

∎ $50,000 for winning national coach of the year;

∎ $10,000 or reaching the final four of the National Invitation Tournament;

∎ $15,000 for winning the NIT;

∎ Kellogg can receive up to $80,000 per season for his team’s academic achievement and progress;

The buyout figure if Kellogg chooses to leave before the end of the contract gets lower as it progresses. If he leaves prior to April 22, 2015 he’ll have to pay $1 million. Before April 22, 2016, the figure would be $800,000; Before April 22, 2017, $700,000; Before April 22, 2018, $600,000; Before April 22, 2019, $500,000; Before April 22, 2020, $250,000.

Matt Vautour can be reached at mvautour@gazettenet.com. Get UMass coverage delivered in your Facebook news feed at www.facebook.com/GazetteUMassCoverage

AMHERST — In a new contract released by the University of Massachusetts Friday, Minuteman men’s basketball coach Derek Kellogg will become the highest-paid state employee in Massachusetts.

Kellogg is guaranteed make $994,500 a year through the 2018-19 season, an amount that could increase if he reaches bonuses based on performances by players on the court and in the classroom.

Kellogg, who was hired in 2008, renegotiated his first contract prior to the 2012-13 season. That deal, which brought his compensation to over $800,000 with performance bonuses, was scheduled to run through the 2016-17 season. The new deal replaces the final three seasons of the previous contract and adds two more.

“We are extremely pleased with the job Derek has done in his time here and feel the program is in a good place,” UMass Athletic Director John McCutcheon said in a statement released by the school. “He has built a solid foundation for the future. We felt it was appropriate to put something together that the university and he are both comfortable with in terms of the extension to keep him here for a long time.”

Kellogg was pleased to have the deal completed.

“I think it’s fantastic. I’m really happy personally and professionally. I think it solidifies our program for the long haul which is something I wanted to do when I came back,” said Kellogg, 41, a 1995 graduate of UMass. “I always wanted to make UMass one of the best jobs out there, a place that isn’t a stopover. I think we’ve done that with the new practice facility and the way we travel and the way the university has become one of the top universities in the country. My family is happy here. I’m really looking forward to this year and getting things underway.”



Kellogg will receive performance reviews after 2014-15 and if he receives a grade of satisfactory or higher, he’ll have a year added to the contract at the same salary terms. There will be another review after 2015-16 with the same potential benefit.

Kellogg is 109-86 in six seasons at UMass and has averaged 23.3 wins over the last three seasons. He led the Minutemen to the 2014 NCAA tournament, the school’s first appearance since 1998.

With his newly inked contract, Kellogg surpasses Michael F. Collins, the chancellor of the UMass medical school, who had been identified as the state’s highest-paid employee in 2011, 2012 and 2013, according to a Boston Globe article. Collins earned $816,602 in 2013.

According to USA Today, Kellogg was paid $843,667 in 2013-14, of which $761,358 was paid by UMass.

While Kellogg’s contract puts him at the top of the heap of state employees, that’s not the case when it comes to other coaches. Of the schools in the 2014 NCAA tournament, Kellogg ranked 40th in compensation. Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski was first making $9,682,032. Kellogg’s new total would move him up to 36th, making him the highest-paid coach earning less than $1 million. Ten of the 68 schools didn’t release their data to USA Today.

According to a Deadspin article from 2013, in 40 states, the highest paid employee was a football or basketball coach. Of those 40, 27 were football coaches, 12 were men’s basketball coaches, while Connecticut’s highest state employee is women’s basketball coach Geno Auriemma.

Kellogg’s base salary is $281,000 for the remainder of 2014, but drops to $225,500 beginning on Jan. 1, 2015. But he’ll also receive $769,000 in “other compensation” for making appearances on behalf of the athletic department.

According to the Massachusetts state employee salary database 2014, UMass Chancellor Kumble Subaswammy’s salary is $388,239.

Among the perks Kellogg is eligible for:

∎ $75,000 for any season in which UMass makes the NCAA tournament and $25,000 for each win in the tournament;

∎ $15,000 for winning 20 regular season games;

∎ $25,000 for winning 23 or more regular season games;

∎ $20,000 for finishing in the top three in the conference standings;

∎ $20,000 for winning the conference championship;

∎ Up to $40,000 for finishing with a strong ranking in the ratings percentage index, a computer formula that measures a team’s success based on strength of schedule. He’d get $10,000 for finishing in the top 50; $20,000 for top 35; $30,000 for top 25 and $40,000 for top 15;

∎ Up to $40,000 for strong schedule strength — $40,000 for top 20; $30,000 for top 40 and $20,000 for top 60;

∎ Up to $25,000 for a strong home attendance — $25,000 for averaging 8,000-plus, $20,000 for 7,000-7999; $15,000 for 6,000-6,999;

∎ $15,000 for winning conference coach of year;

∎ $50,000 for winning national coach of the year;

∎ $10,000 or reaching the final four of the National Invitation Tournament;

∎ $15,000 for winning the NIT;

∎ Kellogg can receive up to $80,000 per season for his team’s academic achievement and progress;

The buyout figure if Kellogg chooses to leave before the end of the contract gets lower as it progresses. If he leaves prior to April 22, 2015 he’ll have to pay $1 million. Before April 22, 2016, the figure would be $800,000; Before April 22, 2017, $700,000; Before April 22, 2018, $600,000; Before April 22, 2019, $500,000; Before April 22, 2020, $250,000.

Matt Vautour can be reached at mvautour@gazettenet.com. Get UMass coverage delivered in your Facebook news feed at www.facebook.com/GazetteUMassCoverage


 


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