‘We can’t lose our momentum:’ Louisiana vows to rebuild

  • Soncia King holds onto her husband Patrick King in Lake Charles, La., Saturday as they walk through the flooded street to their home, after Hurricane Delta moved through on Friday. AP

  • A truck drives through a flooded street in Lake Charles, La., Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, past a home with damage from Hurricane Laura, after Hurricane Delta moved through on Friday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) Gerald Herbert

  • A street is flooded after Hurricane Delta moved through on Friday, in Lake Charles, La., Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) Gerald Herbert

  • Ernest Jack, whose home was severely damaged from Hurricane Laura, sits in his front doorway as he waits for the arrival of Hurricane Delta expected to make landfall later in the day in Lake Charles, La., Friday, Oct. 9, 2020. Debris from Hurricane Laura is piled near the street. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) Gerald Herbert

  • The aftermath of Hurricane Delta is seen Saturday Oct. 10, 2020, near Jennings, La. (Bill Feig/The Advocate via AP, Pool) STAFF PHOTO BY BILL FEIG

  • Marcus Peterson walks past a downed tree in his yard after Hurricane Delta moved through, Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Jennings, La. Delta hit as a Category 2 hurricane with top winds of 100 mph (155 kph) before rapidly weakening over land. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) Gerald Herbert

  • A truck drive through floodwaters in a neighborhood in Lake Charles, La., Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, after Hurricane Delta moved through on Friday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) Gerald Herbert

  • Ernest Jack moves near his home that was hit by Hurricane Laura ahead of Hurricane Delta, Friday, Oct. 9, 2020, in Lake Charles, La. Forecasters said Delta — the 25th named storm of an unprecedented Atlantic hurricane season — would likely crash ashore Friday evening somewhere on southwest Louisiana's coast. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) Gerald Herbert

  • Ronnie Guillory cleans up debris in a yard after Hurricane Delta in Jennings, La., Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020. The morning after Hurricane Delta blew through the besieged Louisiana bayou, residents are checking to see if the Category 2 storm had brought more deaths and destruction to communities with mountains of debris and displaced residents from another hurricane six weeks earlier. (Scott Clause/The Daily Advertiser via AP)

  • A man stands on his front lawn and looks at the flooded street in Lake Charles, La., Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, after Hurricane Delta moved through on Friday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) Gerald Herbert

  • Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards talks about the devastation from Hurricane Delta after flying over the stricken areas in southwest Louisiana during a press conference at the airport Saturday Oct. 10, 2020, in Jennings, La. (Bill Feig/The Advocate via AP, Pool) STAFF PHOTO BY BILL FEIG

  • Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards talks about Hurricane Delta damages before flying to southwest Louisiana Saturday Oct. 10, 2020, in Baton Rouge, La. (Bill Feig/The Advocate via AP, Pool) STAFF PHOTO BY BILL FEIG

  • Leaving a trail in the mud, a horse is exercised in the enclosure in the aftermath of Hurricane Delta Saturday Oct. 10, 2020, in Welsh, La.(Bill Feig/The Advocate via AP, Pool) STAFF PHOTO BY BILL FEIG

  • Houses surrounded by flood waters are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Delta Saturday Oct. 10, 2020, in Welsh, La. (Bill Feig/The Advocate via AP, Pool) STAFF PHOTO BY BILL FEIG

  • A large section of a fallen fence is seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Delta Saturday Oct. 10, 2020, near Lake Arthur, La. (Bill Feig/The Advocate via AP, Pool) STAFF PHOTO BY BILL FEIG

  • Flooded ball fields are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Delta Saturday Oct. 10, 2020, in Welsh, La. (Bill Feig/The Advocate via AP, Pool) STAFF PHOTO BY BILL FEIG

  • A debris field, fallen tree and structure damage are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Delta Saturday Oct. 10, 2020, in Gueydan, La. (Bill Feig/The Advocate via AP, Pool) STAFF PHOTO BY BILL FEIG

  • Blue tarps and destruction are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Delta Saturday Oct. 10, 2020, near Lake Arthur, La. (Bill Feig/The Advocate via AP, Pool) STAFF PHOTO BY BILL FEIG

  • Blue tarps and destruction are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Delta Saturday in Lake Arthur, La. AP

Published: 10/11/2020 7:31:40 PM
Modified: 10/11/2020 7:31:29 PM

LAKE CHARLES, La. — Back-to-back hurricanes in the space of six weeks left this corner of Louisiana blanketed Sunday with tarpaulins, mangled metal and downed power lines — but not necessarily despair.

Utility crews fanned out across the battered southwestern part of the state to restore electricity in the wake of Hurricane Delta, and residents began returning home along roads lined with debris and houses missing roofs. Some were grateful that the damage was not as bad as it could have been.

Nearly 370,000 customers in Louisiana remained without power two days after Delta blew ashore near the town of Creole with winds of 100 mph (155 kph), slamming a part of the state still recovering from Hurricane Laura’s 150 mph (241 kph) onslaught Aug. 27. Laura was blamed for 32 deaths.

The remnants of Delta, meanwhile, dumped heavy rain on parts of Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia.

A 19-year-old tourist from Illinois drowned and another swimmer was rescued after they were caught in a rip current unleashed by the storm off Destin, Florida, authorities said.

The storm was also blamed for washing out a railroad track and causing the derailment of a freight train in the Atlanta area that sparked a small fire and briefly forced some residents from their homes. Two crew members were taken to a hospital for observation and later released.

Clair Hebert Marceaux lost her home in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, during Hurricane Laura and said the community was hard at work on rebuilding when Delta struck.

“We can’t lose our momentum,” she said, though she added there was “utter devastation” in the area.

Marceaux, who was born and raised in Cameron Parish, is the director of the community’s busy port, which hosts fleets of shrimp and crab boats and serves as a key link in the region’s oil and gas industry.

Vessel traffic was halted until port authorities and the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers could take stock of the damage. Sunken boats, utility poles and other flotsam filled waterways.

“We are still in an assessment phase,” Marceaux said, “but we will be limping along as best as we can.”

Lynn Nguyen and her four children fled to Fort Walton, Florida, ahead of the storm and returned home to Abbeville, Louisiana, on a circuitous route to avoid flooded roads. Her home was spared major damage, though a fence was flattened.

“For the most part, I’m just glad I still have a job and a roof over my head,” said Nguyen, who works at a seafood market.

Earnestine and Milton Wesley had decided to ride out Delta in their Lake Charles home, damaged by Laura. As the wind rustled the roof tarp above them, they grabbed it through the hole in the ceiling and held on tight. Water poured in, flooding their den.

“We fought all night long trying to keep things intact,” Milton said. “And with God’s help we made it.”

After blowing ashore, Delta moved over Lake Charles, a city where Laura damaged nearly every home and building.

Before Friday’s storm, the streets were already lined with mountains of debris from the previous hurricane — soggy insulation, moldy mattresses, tree limbs, twisted metal siding, ruined family treasures. Lake Charles Mayor Nic Hunter estimated hundreds of already damaged homes took on water from Delta, which dumped more than 15 inches (38 centimeters) of rain on the city over two days.

Delta, the 25th named storm of an unprecedented Atlantic hurricane season, was the 10th to hit the mainland U.S. this year, breaking a record set in 1916, Colorado State University researcher Phil Klotzbach said.

The floodwaters surged up the Wesley family’s front yard, and they were terrified it would pour inside, but it stopped short of the door. It carried with it bags of trash and muck, swept up from their neighbors’ piles of debris from the prior storm.

“The water was something else last night,” Milton said. “We’ve never seen it flood so bad out here, to the point I could have swam out here last night, that’s just how deep it was.”




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