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Richard W.Tracy: Full-page ad on Social Security office off-base

FILE - This Aug. 14, 1935 black-and-white file photo shows President Franklin D. Roosevelt signing the Social Security Bill in Washington. These are complicated times in the affairs of Washington and the nation, with death stars everywhere and all of them a struggle to comprehend. The partial government shutdown, the debt limit squeeze just around the corner, sequestration, how they fit with the health care law, how they don’t _ it just goes on. When Roosevelt set up public pensions in 1935, he didn’t call it the Happy Retirees Act or the Justice for Deserving Seniors Act or the Golden Years Contentment Act. He called it the Social Security Act. In those apparently more serious and less pandering times, perish the thought of a No Child Left Behind Act. (AP Photo, File)

FILE - This Aug. 14, 1935 black-and-white file photo shows President Franklin D. Roosevelt signing the Social Security Bill in Washington. These are complicated times in the affairs of Washington and the nation, with death stars everywhere and all of them a struggle to comprehend. The partial government shutdown, the debt limit squeeze just around the corner, sequestration, how they fit with the health care law, how they don’t _ it just goes on. When Roosevelt set up public pensions in 1935, he didn’t call it the Happy Retirees Act or the Justice for Deserving Seniors Act or the Golden Years Contentment Act. He called it the Social Security Act. In those apparently more serious and less pandering times, perish the thought of a No Child Left Behind Act. (AP Photo, File)

To the editor:

I was intrigued by the full page political ad in the Aug. 1 Gazette which brought up an issue that needs to be discussed widely in all sections of our society today. But the view expressed is a very small snapshot of the issue. The number of people under the age of 65 using Social Security is a serious issue and needs to be addressed. First we need to examine why those people need to be there.

The statement that “the system doesn’t work” is not totally accurate. In fact for some people the system works very well, and in some cases it is a life saver. Why are so many people there? For one reason, 50 years ago many people were cared for in state institutions for the mentally handicapped. Today those institutions are gone and these people now need to cope in our open society.

Budgets for mental health have been cut drastically.

A second issue is domestic violence. It is a safe bet that some of those 37 people were victims of domestic abuse. When will we men finally get disgusted enough to take out full page ads against those losers who abuse women?

Thirdly, we have just come through the worst recession since the Great Depression of 1929 and the 1930s. Although we have had four years of steady improvement, many of the lower income brackets haven’t been called back to work yet.

Lastly, and most importantly, is the ever-widening spread between the wealthiest and the poorest of our citizens.

Finally, to answer the ad’s first and last question: Nobody voted for this. It is a situation that has evolved because billionaires and their lobbyists have been able to buy or coerce legislation that favors the rich and hurts the needy. It is a very serious situation, and a time for all voters to work against this unequal behavior of our Congress.

Richard W.Tracy

Westhampton

Legacy Comments3

Yay Bill!

I'll vote for you!

Right on!

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