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Gov. Deval Patrick lifts travel ban, asks for patience during blizzard cleanup

  • A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond.  (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Guy McChesney pulls Lucas McChesney and Nico Doyle on a sled up Munjoy Hill during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    Guy McChesney pulls Lucas McChesney and Nico Doyle on a sled up Munjoy Hill during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) Purchase photo reprints »

  • A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond.  (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Snow-covered cars sit in a parking lot adjacent to where firefighters battle a 4-alarm fire in a 3-story apartment building in Wilmington, Mass., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. A major winter storm is well under way in the U.S. Northeast with up to 2 feet of snow expected for a Boston-anchored region that has seen mostly bare ground this winter.  (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Snow-covered cars sit in a parking lot adjacent to where firefighters battle a 4-alarm fire in a 3-story apartment building in Wilmington, Mass., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. A major winter storm is well under way in the U.S. Northeast with up to 2 feet of snow expected for a Boston-anchored region that has seen mostly bare ground this winter. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) Purchase photo reprints »

  • A dog pulls a snowboarder through the Boston Common in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    A dog pulls a snowboarder through the Boston Common in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Mike Brown, of Boston, cross country skis past snow covered cars through the Chinatown neighborhood of Boston, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013. The Boston area received about two feet of snow from a winter storm. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    Mike Brown, of Boston, cross country skis past snow covered cars through the Chinatown neighborhood of Boston, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013. The Boston area received about two feet of snow from a winter storm. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Private contractors working for the N.J. Dept. of Transportation wait for the snow to start falling as 13 trucks are lined up just off exit 3 on Rt. 78 in Greenwich, N.J., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz)

    Private contractors working for the N.J. Dept. of Transportation wait for the snow to start falling as 13 trucks are lined up just off exit 3 on Rt. 78 in Greenwich, N.J., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz) Purchase photo reprints »

  • A vehicle moves down a nearly empty highway as a sign warns of a snow emergency at the entrance to the Ted Williams Tunnel, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A vehicle moves down a nearly empty highway as a sign warns of a snow emergency at the entrance to the Ted Williams Tunnel, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Purchase photo reprints »

  • A couple walks down the illuminated, snow-covered Commonwealth Avenue Mall in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    A couple walks down the illuminated, snow-covered Commonwealth Avenue Mall in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Deb Hanley, left, and Frank McGuire dig about three feet of snow from around their car outside their home in the Beacon Hill neighborhood of Boston, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013. The Boston area received about two feet of snow from a winter storm. A howling storm across the Northeast left the New York-to-Boston corridor shrouded in 1 to 3 feet of snow Saturday, stranding motorists on highways overnight and piling up drifts so high that some homeowners couldn't get their doors open. More than 650,000 homes and businesses were left without electricity. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    Deb Hanley, left, and Frank McGuire dig about three feet of snow from around their car outside their home in the Beacon Hill neighborhood of Boston, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013. The Boston area received about two feet of snow from a winter storm. A howling storm across the Northeast left the New York-to-Boston corridor shrouded in 1 to 3 feet of snow Saturday, stranding motorists on highways overnight and piling up drifts so high that some homeowners couldn't get their doors open. More than 650,000 homes and businesses were left without electricity. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) Purchase photo reprints »

  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Joggers run around the Boston Commons after a ban on vehicles went into effect at 4:00 p.m.  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    Joggers run around the Boston Commons after a ban on vehicles went into effect at 4:00 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Purchase photo reprints »

  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Purchase photo reprints »

  • A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Purchase photo reprints »

  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

    A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Purchase photo reprints »

  • A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond.  (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
  • Guy McChesney pulls Lucas McChesney and Nico Doyle on a sled up Munjoy Hill during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
  • A woman crosses Congress Street during a snow storm, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, in Portland, Maine. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond.  (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
  • Snow-covered cars sit in a parking lot adjacent to where firefighters battle a 4-alarm fire in a 3-story apartment building in Wilmington, Mass., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. A major winter storm is well under way in the U.S. Northeast with up to 2 feet of snow expected for a Boston-anchored region that has seen mostly bare ground this winter.  (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
  • A dog pulls a snowboarder through the Boston Common in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
  • Mike Brown, of Boston, cross country skis past snow covered cars through the Chinatown neighborhood of Boston, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013. The Boston area received about two feet of snow from a winter storm. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
  • Private contractors working for the N.J. Dept. of Transportation wait for the snow to start falling as 13 trucks are lined up just off exit 3 on Rt. 78 in Greenwich, N.J., Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz)
  • A vehicle moves down a nearly empty highway as a sign warns of a snow emergency at the entrance to the Ted Williams Tunnel, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A couple walks down the illuminated, snow-covered Commonwealth Avenue Mall in Boston, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
  • Deb Hanley, left, and Frank McGuire dig about three feet of snow from around their car outside their home in the Beacon Hill neighborhood of Boston, Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013. The Boston area received about two feet of snow from a winter storm. A howling storm across the Northeast left the New York-to-Boston corridor shrouded in 1 to 3 feet of snow Saturday, stranding motorists on highways overnight and piling up drifts so high that some homeowners couldn't get their doors open. More than 650,000 homes and businesses were left without electricity. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • Joggers run around the Boston Commons after a ban on vehicles went into effect at 4:00 p.m.  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston. Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A man crosses a traffic-less Tremont street in downtown Boston at rush hour, Friday, Feb. 8, 2013. Deval Patrick declared a state of emergency Friday and banned travel on roads as of 4 p.m. as a blizzard that could bring nearly 3 feet of snow to the region began to intensify. As the storm gains strength, it will bring "extremely dangerous conditions" with bands of snow dropping up to 2 to 3 inches per hour at the height of the blizzard, Patrick said.  (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
  • A snow plow clears the paths in the Boston Commons,  Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 in Boston.Snow began falling across the Northeast on Friday, ushering in what was predicted to be a huge, possibly historic blizzard and sending residents scurrying to stock up on food and gas up their cars. The storm could dump 1 to 3 feet of snow from New York City to Boston and beyond. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

He says there’s a lot of snow to remove and it will take some time to do that. People in the western part of the state and Nantucket County can drive now and everyone else can get back on the roads at 4, though Patrick is asking them to stay home unless they need to be out.

He says the ban helped keep people safe on the roads.

He says the MBTA may start running some subways Sunday but the goal is to get public transit up and running for the Monday morning commute.

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