Daily Hampshire Gazette - Established 1786
Cloudy
50°
Cloudy
Hi 55° | Lo 39°

Turnout heavy as voters line up in Hampshire County

  • Amherst voters wait to cast their ballots in precinct 10 set up in the Glass Room at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voters wait to cast their ballots in precinct 10 set up in the Glass Room at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • David McClaflin talks about voting Tuesday morning at Ryan Road school.<br/><br/>

    David McClaflin talks about voting Tuesday morning at Ryan Road school.

    Purchase photo reprints »

  • Elaine Hogan,  Ward 6 resident of Northampton, didn’t waste any time saying what drew her to the polls at the R.K. Finn Ryan Road School.  <br/>“I want Mitt Romney to get in,” Hogan said, shortly after voting Tuesday.<br/>CAROL LOLLIS

    Elaine Hogan, Ward 6 resident of Northampton, didn’t waste any time saying what drew her to the polls at the R.K. Finn Ryan Road School.
    “I want Mitt Romney to get in,” Hogan said, shortly after voting Tuesday.
    CAROL LOLLIS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Hadley voters Hope Noyes, left, and Kurtis Mckemmie brought their son Alex, 3 1/2, with them to Hopkins Academy to cast their ballots Tuesday morning.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Hadley voters Hope Noyes, left, and Kurtis Mckemmie brought their son Alex, 3 1/2, with them to Hopkins Academy to cast their ballots Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • About a dozen cars idled outside of East Meadow School in Granby as voters waited for the town's two precincts to open at 6 a.m. on Tuesday, an hour earlier than in most of the state.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    About a dozen cars idled outside of East Meadow School in Granby as voters waited for the town's two precincts to open at 6 a.m. on Tuesday, an hour earlier than in most of the state.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Only a short time after 6 a.m., Granby residents were already lined up inside East Meadow School to vote.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Only a short time after 6 a.m., Granby residents were already lined up inside East Meadow School to vote.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Business was brisk just after 6 a.m. Tuesday in the cafetorium of Granby's East Meadow School, where both of the town's precincts opened for voters an hour earlier than in most of the state.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Business was brisk just after 6 a.m. Tuesday in the cafetorium of Granby's East Meadow School, where both of the town's precincts opened for voters an hour earlier than in most of the state.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Hadley voter Andrew Morris-Friedman n of 45 Roosevelt St., said he is thrilled that every vote matters in this election because of the contest for the U.S. Senate seat. He had just cast his ballot at Hopkins Academy.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Hadley voter Andrew Morris-Friedman n of 45 Roosevelt St., said he is thrilled that every vote matters in this election because of the contest for the U.S. Senate seat. He had just cast his ballot at Hopkins Academy.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter Alan Root talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter Alan Root talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter Ron Grosslein talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter Ron Grosslein talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter Joan Swift prepares to leave the Bangs Center after casting her ballot Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter Joan Swift prepares to leave the Bangs Center after casting her ballot Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter William Miller talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter William Miller talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Voters flock to White Brook Middle School in Easthampton Tuesday morning to cast their ballots for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS

    Voters flock to White Brook Middle School in Easthampton Tuesday morning to cast their ballots for the 2012 election.
    JOSH KUCKENS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Easthampton voter Mark Anderson voices his opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning before casting his ballot for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS

    Easthampton voter Mark Anderson voices his opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning before casting his ballot for the 2012 election.
    JOSH KUCKENS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Easthampton voter Karen Klinger voices her opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning before casting her ballot for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS

    Easthampton voter Karen Klinger voices her opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning before casting her ballot for the 2012 election.
    JOSH KUCKENS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voters line up to cast their ballots in three precincts set up at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voters line up to cast their ballots in three precincts set up at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Easthampton voter Amanda Dalton voices her opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning after casting her ballot for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS

    Easthampton voter Amanda Dalton voices her opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning after casting her ballot for the 2012 election.
    JOSH KUCKENS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Easthampton voter Bob Buschey voices his opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning before casting his ballot for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS

    Easthampton voter Bob Buschey voices his opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning before casting his ballot for the 2012 election.
    JOSH KUCKENS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Voters flock to White Brook Middle School in Easthampton Tuesday morning to cast their ballots for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS<br/>

    Voters flock to White Brook Middle School in Easthampton Tuesday morning to cast their ballots for the 2012 election.
    JOSH KUCKENS
    Purchase photo reprints »

  • Voters flock to White Brook Middle School in Easthampton Tuesday morning to cast their ballots for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS

    Voters flock to White Brook Middle School in Easthampton Tuesday morning to cast their ballots for the 2012 election.
    JOSH KUCKENS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Easthampton voters Edmund and Tiffany Wanat  of Loudville Road said they believe the Proposition 21/2 override is a bad idea because it is too soon after an $18 million debt exclusion override to build a new high school in 2010.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS

    Easthampton voters Edmund and Tiffany Wanat of Loudville Road said they believe the Proposition 21/2 override is a bad idea because it is too soon after an $18 million debt exclusion override to build a new high school in 2010.
    JOSH KUCKENS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Over 1100 Hadley voters had cast their ballots at Hopkins Academy by 11:30 Tuesday morning.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Over 1100 Hadley voters had cast their ballots at Hopkins Academy by 11:30 Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter Joan Swift talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter Joan Swift talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voters wait to cast their ballots in precinct 10 set up in the Glass Room at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • David McClaflin talks about voting Tuesday morning at Ryan Road school.<br/><br/>
  • Elaine Hogan,  Ward 6 resident of Northampton, didn’t waste any time saying what drew her to the polls at the R.K. Finn Ryan Road School.  <br/>“I want Mitt Romney to get in,” Hogan said, shortly after voting Tuesday.<br/>CAROL LOLLIS
  • Hadley voters Hope Noyes, left, and Kurtis Mckemmie brought their son Alex, 3 1/2, with them to Hopkins Academy to cast their ballots Tuesday morning.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • About a dozen cars idled outside of East Meadow School in Granby as voters waited for the town's two precincts to open at 6 a.m. on Tuesday, an hour earlier than in most of the state.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Only a short time after 6 a.m., Granby residents were already lined up inside East Meadow School to vote.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Business was brisk just after 6 a.m. Tuesday in the cafetorium of Granby's East Meadow School, where both of the town's precincts opened for voters an hour earlier than in most of the state.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Hadley voter Andrew Morris-Friedman n of 45 Roosevelt St., said he is thrilled that every vote matters in this election because of the contest for the U.S. Senate seat. He had just cast his ballot at Hopkins Academy.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter Alan Root talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter Ron Grosslein talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter Joan Swift prepares to leave the Bangs Center after casting her ballot Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter William Miller talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Voters flock to White Brook Middle School in Easthampton Tuesday morning to cast their ballots for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS
  • Easthampton voter Mark Anderson voices his opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning before casting his ballot for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS
  • Easthampton voter Karen Klinger voices her opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning before casting her ballot for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS
  • Amherst voters line up to cast their ballots in three precincts set up at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Easthampton voter Amanda Dalton voices her opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning after casting her ballot for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS
  • Easthampton voter Bob Buschey voices his opinion at White Brook Middle School Tuesday morning before casting his ballot for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS
  • Voters flock to White Brook Middle School in Easthampton Tuesday morning to cast their ballots for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS<br/>
  • Voters flock to White Brook Middle School in Easthampton Tuesday morning to cast their ballots for the 2012 election.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS
  • Easthampton voters Edmund and Tiffany Wanat  of Loudville Road said they believe the Proposition 21/2 override is a bad idea because it is too soon after an $18 million debt exclusion override to build a new high school in 2010.<br/>JOSH KUCKENS
  • Over 1100 Hadley voters had cast their ballots at Hopkins Academy by 11:30 Tuesday morning.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter Joan Swift talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

In Amherst, the voting line at the Bangs Center was out the door and starting to snake towards Kellogg Street at 5 p.m. They ran out of “I Voted” stickers, too.

South Hadley had traffic tied up on Newton Street in the late afternoon as cars inched into the high school parking lot. The school is the town’s only polling place. Similar backups took place in Belchertown and Granby.

Enough of Northampton’s Ward 1 residents flocked to vote at Jackson Street School that the ballot box “filled up entirely” at 3:30 p.m., said Sasha Nyary, a constable for Ward 1B.

CLICK HERE for local election returns.

“That’s the first time that’s ever happened, apparently,” Nyary said.

Poll workers emptied the 1,700 ballots in the box and promptly started filling it up again. When he reported for duty as a voting warden at JFK Middle School in Northampton early Tuesday, Mike LaRiviere did a double take.

“People were waiting outside at 6:45 when I got here,” said LaRiviere, the Ward 7 voting warden. “That’s never happened before.”

Three hours later, LaRiviere reported a brisk business with voters from throughout Ward 7 coming in waves throughout the morning.

“There really hasn’t been a lull,” he said.

Similar scenes played out throughout Hampshire County Tuesday as voters, eager to cast ballots after a lengthy campaign season, finally got the chance to do so.

Tuesday’s election in Northampton was a bit different, however, because voters were filling out two ballots — one for the general election and another for a special municipal ballot.

The race for president

Voters approached by Gazette reporters were drawn to the polls for a variety of reasons, though most said the race for president was foremost on their minds.

Robert Zimmermann, a Ward 7 voter in Northampton, and his wife, Athleen Ellington, said Obama is not getting credit for the “many great things” he’s done for the country. He deserves to be re-elected, especially given the alternative in Romney, the couple said.

“The prospect of Romney being president is really scary,” Zimmermann said.

Many voters shared the feelings of Andrea Waller, 30, of 35 Bissonette Circle in Southampton, who said, “We don’t want Mitt Romney as president. I think Obama did a great job.”

Northampton’s Elaine Hogan stands on the other side of the aisle. She is more afraid of what a second term for Obama will mean for the country. Hogan, a Ward 6 resident, didn’t waste any time saying what drew her to the polls at Ryan Road Elementary School.

“I want Mitt Romney to get in,” Hogan said, shortly after voting.

Hogan said believes Romney is a job-creator and proven leader.

“Obama might be a wonderful man but he just isn’t material for president,” she said. “Romney has leadership. We need that so bad ... Mitt Romney just has that ability to run a country. That’s why I voted for him.”

Mickey and Leo Murawski, voting in Southampton, couldn’t agree more.

“We want a new president,” said Mickey Murawski, 80. “I think it’s time.”

Robert Donais of 6 Golden Circle in Southampton, said he was voting to give Obama four more years in office.

“I know he didn’t have the opportunity to do everything he promised in his first term, but my thinking is everyone needs a year or two to figure it out and get started,” he said. “I think he’ll get the job done.”

Romney also drew support from Scott and Dawn Roth, Belchertown residents who cast votes for Romney because they think he will support the military. Scott Roth is a U.S. Air Force veteran and the couple also has two children who have served in the military in Afghanistan and Iraq.

“I like his views on the military,” said Dawn Roth, 48. “I also think he can do something about food stamps, welfare and all the taxes on us.”

Not all voted the traditional ticket. Amanda Dalton, 27, of Union Street in Easthampton, said she voted for Jill Stein, the Green Party candidate for president, in her second time voting in a presidential election.

“In my first election, I voted Democratic, just thinking, ‘Great, he’s not Bush,’” she said. “But this time, after looking at the issues and getting more informed, I found the Green Party is more in line with what I would like to see happen.”

The race for Senate

While many were focused on the tight race for president, the race for state Senate was also on people’s minds.

“I think Romney will do a wonderful job as president,” Leo Murawski said. “And I think Scott Brown will do a good job, too.”

At Southampton Town Hall, Howard Wing of Valley Road said he also came to cast his vote for Brown.

“I have strong feelings about Elizabeth Warren,” said Wing, 73. “She wants to get another liberal judge on the Supreme Court — that bothers me — and her position on contraception coverage for people under insurance is ridiculous.”

At Hadley’s polls, Hope Noyes and Kurtis McKemmie of 34 Greenleaves Drive were accompanied by their 3-year-old son, Alex, who was riding in a stroller.

“I wanted to vote for Obama, and I want to see Elizabeth Warren for the senate. I like what she stands for,” Noyes said.

While McKemmie, too, is supporting Warren because of her stances on education, especially helping college students, McKemmie differed from Noyes in his pick for president.

“I voted for Romney because during the debate he talked about more employment and jobs and concerns about Obamacare,” McKemmie said.

Robert Bushey, 68, of Florence Road in Easthampton, threw his support behind Warren, saying he did not approve of Brown’s voting record.

“He votes most of the time as an independent, but he voted against raising taxes on the wealthy,” he said. Bushey believes wealthy people should pay higher taxes.

Jonathan Gulow, 54, a Ward 5 resident in Northampton, said it rubs him the wrong way when Brown hitches himself to the Republican party and then calls himself an independent.

“You can’t have it both ways. If you want to be an Independent, then run as an Independent and act like it,” said Gulow, shortly before voting at the Florence Civic Center.

Like many Warren supporters, Bushey and Gulow both said they back Obama’s reelection bid. Bushey said he is “strongly opposed” to Romney’s plans for Social Security, while Gulow said he was just trying to help Obama. “I’d rather not have Romney in there,” he said.

Northampton’s Clara Li believes the country is heading in the right direction and that Obama has done a good job. She voted to give Obama another term, and hopes that Warren also wins.

“I just trust her,” Li said.

On the local front

Voters also expressed opinions on local issues, such as a $1.4 million override for the schools in Easthampton and the first charter change in Northampton in 129 years.

At White Brook Middle School in Easthampton, Walter Sliz said he was voting against the override.

“I’m a senior citizen, I’m 92 years old, how much more money can I give?” he said. “They’ve got to start tightening up their budget.”

Tammy Lieber of East Street said she’d rather not see the override pass.

“We have no cash to pay it now, and we’re talking about adding another $250 a house,” she said.

Edmund and Tiffany Wanat of Loudville Road reasoned that the override is a bad idea because it is too soon after voters OK’d an $18 million debt exclusion override to build a new high school in 2010.

“I feel that the property taxes are high enough already because of the last school override,” he said.

The override also had its supporters.

“I think there’s no better investment than education, so I’m an easy vote in that sense,” Mark Anderson said.

The charter vote in Northampton drew many blank stares from voters who were unclear about what the changes will mean, though most interviewed said they voted in favor of it.

“I don’t really understand the charter one, but I’m in favor of it because it’s probably time to get with the times,” said Gulow, noting that the charter has not been updated in more than a century. Tim Straw, of Ward 7, agreed, saying “it’s time for a change.”

Most had an opinion on whether the mayor’s term in office should be four years instead of two. That’s one of the main changes in the charter. Many believe the extra time will enable a mayor to get more done without being diverted by a campaign.

“You can’t get anything done in two years,” said Ellington. “I think it’s a good thing.” Hogan, of Ward 6, said the change is unneeded.

“I don’t think the mayor should have four years,” she said. “Why? Because if they aren’t any good we should get them out.”

LaRiviere, the poll warden in Northampton, said many people were confused about the charter question and ended up not casting a ballot.

“A lot of people were not educated about it,” he said, noting that many said they were uncomfortable giving an up-or-down vote to the entire change. In those cases, voters were able to return their ballots.

Other issues

A few voters expressed support for the so-called Death with Dignity ballot question, an issue supported by Irving and Amanda Weisenthal, of Ward 7 in Northampton. Question 2 would allow assisted suicide of terminally ill patients.

“I do believe people have the right to die,” said Amanda Weisenthal, 41. “This issue will affect us all in a big way.”

Irving Weisenthal said he doesn’t believe that politicians, insurance companies and the medical community will ever reach consensus on the issue, which he thinks most people favor.

“I don’t think that will ever happen, so let’s do what the people want,” he said.

Elizabeth and Eugene Greaney, both 70, of South Hadley, said they voted against Question 2.

“I worry that such a law could be misapplied and I also have religious reasons for opposing it,” Eugene Greaney said. “Life comes from God and only God should end it.”

David Keefe, 57, of South Hadley said he voted in favor of Question 2.

“I believe in choice. People should have that right,” he said.

Ronald Grosslein of 51 Columbia Drive in Amherst said he was motivated in his votes in part by environmental issues.

“I think the most important issue is human-induced climate change. There’s a clear-cut difference between the Democratic and Republican candidates,” Grosslein said. “I think Obama gets it, but his hands are tied by gridlock.”

Grosslein has similar concerns in the Senate race: He worries that Brown may allow overfishing in the North Atlantic, while Warren understands the need to preserve the supply.

Andrew Morris-Friedman of 45 Roosevelt St., Hadley, said he is thrilled that the vote matters in the state.

“We finally have an election in Massachusetts where every vote counts,” Morris-Friedman said. “The Massachusetts race will help determine control of the Senate, which will be a big deal if Obama loses, which God willing he won’t.”

He said he was also pleased to vote in favor of a ballot question asking Sen. Stanley Rosenberg, D-Amherst, to sponsor a constitutional amendment to overturn the Citizens United Supreme Court decision.

Proud to vote

Many interviewed talked about how important voting is, especially in an election like this one.

“Every time I vote, there is a sense of pride and appreciation that we have the opportunity to do so,” said Linda Aird, 61, of Granby.

Joanne Swift, of 55 Cherry Lane in Amherst, echoed that sentiment.

“This is the most wonderful endeavor a citizen can do in the greatest country in the world,” she said.

Swift said her only problem is the campaigns are filled with too much negativity. Belchertown resident Jane Crutchfield, 59, found the $2 billion price tag of the presidential race distasteful.

“It’s too much money,” she said. “It’s a ridiculous amount of money spent, especially when most people already know who they’re voting for.”

Alan Root of 33 Kellogg Ave. in Amherst said he never misses a vote.

“I have a sense of religiosity when it comes to showing up at the polls or voting by absentee ballot,” said Root, who cast his first ballot in a presidential election in 1960 for John F. Kennedy.

“We should vote more often, not less often,” Root said.

Art Frigon and wife Barbara, both 74 of Belchertown said they enjoyed voting.

“I love politics,” he said. “We always vote,” added his wife.

Kari Bachand, 38, said voting is both a right and a civic duty, a lesson she wants to hand down to her children. “We always vote and we always bring the kids with us,” she said.

Easthampton’s Karen Klinger of 47 Sterling Drive said she was voting for Obama and Warren. She admitted she was “not necessarily thrilled” with how politicians have been running the government, but she supported Obama and Warren because of their stances on women’s rights.

“As I was coming here today I was thinking about how easy this is, and other places, people are ducking gunfire to vote, or in New York or New Jersey, scrambling to vote,” she added. “So I think it’s your duty to vote, no matter who you vote for.”

And in Northampton, David McClaflin, 64, said he voted Tuesday for only the second time in his life. McClaflin voted for Romney and Brown because he believes the country has lost its moral compass and government is too big.

“I’m watching the country fall apart and I wanted to do something about it,” the Ward 6 resident said. “I really think we need to get the country back on track.”

Related

Learning experience for children, first-time voters

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

With Amherst and Hadley elementary schools not in session Tuesday, some voters heading to the polls brought their children along with them, showing them what it’s like to vote. Jennifer Dempsey of 92 Dana St. in Amherst took her children, Emily May, 10, and Charlie May, 7, into the voting booth with her so they could see firsthand how a …

Legacy Comments0
There are no comments yet. Be the first!
Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.