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Spring gardening symposium at Frontier Regional High School

  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>The blinded sphinx moth is related to the sphinx moth that produces the dread tobacco hornworm. The white appendages are eggs of a parastical wasp that helps control the moth population.

    PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY
    The blinded sphinx moth is related to the sphinx moth that produces the dread tobacco hornworm. The white appendages are eggs of a parastical wasp that helps control the moth population.

  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>Doug Tellamy, author of "Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants," is the keynote speaker at the master gardener symposium on March 16. He is an entomology professor at the University of Delaware.

    PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY
    Doug Tellamy, author of "Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants," is the keynote speaker at the master gardener symposium on March 16. He is an entomology professor at the University of Delaware.

  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>Milkweed bugs feed in groups and keep the population of wild milkweed under control, leaving plenty of plants for the monarchs but preventing the milkweed from taking over landscapes.

    PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY
    Milkweed bugs feed in groups and keep the population of wild milkweed under control, leaving plenty of plants for the monarchs but preventing the milkweed from taking over landscapes.

  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>This colorful caterpillar morphs into the Monarch butterfly, which lays its eggs on the plant so its larvae will have food

    PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY
    This colorful caterpillar morphs into the Monarch butterfly, which lays its eggs on the plant so its larvae will have food

  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>Red-bellied woodpeckers enjoy suet from the feeder during the winter but can eat their weight in insects year-round. Like most woodpeckers they extract insect larvae from tree trunks as well as eating flying insects, such as beetles and grasshoppers, in season.

    PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY
    Red-bellied woodpeckers enjoy suet from the feeder during the winter but can eat their weight in insects year-round. Like most woodpeckers they extract insect larvae from tree trunks as well as eating flying insects, such as beetles and grasshoppers, in season.

  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>The Zebra swallowtail is butterfly whose larvae or caterpillars feed on pawpaw. Caterpillars of a relative, the black swallowtail, feed on members of the carrot family, including parsley and dill.

    PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY
    The Zebra swallowtail is butterfly whose larvae or caterpillars feed on pawpaw. Caterpillars of a relative, the black swallowtail, feed on members of the carrot family, including parsley and dill.

  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>The blinded sphinx moth is related to the sphinx moth that produces the dread tobacco hornworm. The white appendages are eggs of a parastical wasp that helps control the moth population.
  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>Doug Tellamy, author of "Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants," is the keynote speaker at the master gardener symposium on March 16. He is an entomology professor at the University of Delaware.
  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>Milkweed bugs feed in groups and keep the population of wild milkweed under control, leaving plenty of plants for the monarchs but preventing the milkweed from taking over landscapes.
  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>This colorful caterpillar morphs into the Monarch butterfly, which lays its eggs on the plant so its larvae will have food
  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>Red-bellied woodpeckers enjoy suet from the feeder during the winter but can eat their weight in insects year-round. Like most woodpeckers they extract insect larvae from tree trunks as well as eating flying insects, such as beetles and grasshoppers, in season.
  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DOUG TELLAMY<br/>The Zebra swallowtail is butterfly whose larvae or caterpillars feed on pawpaw. Caterpillars of a relative, the black swallowtail, feed on members of the carrot family, including parsley and dill.

“Bringing Nature Home,” the spring gardening symposium of the Western Massachusetts Master Gardener Association, will be held March 16 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Frontier Regional High School in South Deerfield.

In addition to the keynote lecture by Doug Tallamy, chair of the entomology department at the University of Delaware, there will be two workshop sessions offering a choice of eight topics in each time slot.

Ellen Souza, author of “The Green Garden” and owner of Turkey Hill Brook Farm in Spencer, will discuss Habitat Landscaping in one session. John Forti, of Strawbery Banke Museum in New Hampshire, will talk about Heirloom and Native Plants.

Denise Lemay and Mary Ellen Warchol of Stockbridge Herbs will offer two cooking demonstrations. Nick Dine, emeritus professor of landscape architecture at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, will show how garden arts combine with healing arts in hospital gardens.

Master gardeners will offer workshops on gardening with birds and butterflies, organic gardening, composting, shade gardens and viburnums. Other demonstration workshops will focus on rain barrels, gardening with mushrooms and creating hypertufa troughs.

A final workshop explains growing plants for their essential oils in healing.

A workshop on making a bentwood trellis is already filled.

The fee for the day is $35. A box lunch is available for an additional $8.50, or bring your own. There will be a sale of books and a section of vendors of garden-related items. Registration forms are available at local garden centers and online at www.wmassmastergardeners.org.

Walk-ins are welcome.

For information, send an email to Lucy Altman at gardensymposium123@gmail.com or call 665-7174.

— CHERYL B. WILSON

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Friday, March 15, 2013

The clarion call to landscape with native plants instead of imported species is getting louder. Adding to the argument is entomologist Doug Tallamy, who offers a cogent explanation about how native plants need native insects that pollinate our flowers and add to the food web. Tallamy, author of “Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants,” is … 0

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