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Around Southampton: Norris students quilt for bombing victims

  • Students in Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton work while Cheyenne Redfern has a turn sewing a quilt with quilt mother Tammy Walunas on June 14, 2013. Diemand's classes have made quilts before to donate to hospitals and charities, but these specific quilts will be donated to Boston Marathon bombing victims. Some might also be donated to victims of the recent Oklahoma tornado.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

    Students in Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton work while Cheyenne Redfern has a turn sewing a quilt with quilt mother Tammy Walunas on June 14, 2013. Diemand's classes have made quilts before to donate to hospitals and charities, but these specific quilts will be donated to Boston Marathon bombing victims. Some might also be donated to victims of the recent Oklahoma tornado.
    AYRIKA WHITNEY Purchase photo reprints »

  • Caroline Taylor, a second grader at William E. Norris School in Southampton, sews a quilt with the help of the class' quilt mother, Tammy Walunas, on June 14, 2013. The quilts that the children have been making over the past two weeks will be donated to survivors of the Boston Marathon bombing. Any quilts left over will be sent to survivors of the Oklahoma tornadoes.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

    Caroline Taylor, a second grader at William E. Norris School in Southampton, sews a quilt with the help of the class' quilt mother, Tammy Walunas, on June 14, 2013. The quilts that the children have been making over the past two weeks will be donated to survivors of the Boston Marathon bombing. Any quilts left over will be sent to survivors of the Oklahoma tornadoes.
    AYRIKA WHITNEY Purchase photo reprints »

  • Mason Mish, a second grader in Cindy Diemand's class at William E. Norris school in Southampton, sews a quilt in class with "quilt mother" Tammy Walunas on June 14, 2013. The class has made quilts before for various charities and organizations, and these quilts will be sent to Boston Marathon bombing victims and Oklahoma tornado victims.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

    Mason Mish, a second grader in Cindy Diemand's class at William E. Norris school in Southampton, sews a quilt in class with "quilt mother" Tammy Walunas on June 14, 2013. The class has made quilts before for various charities and organizations, and these quilts will be sent to Boston Marathon bombing victims and Oklahoma tornado victims.
    AYRIKA WHITNEY Purchase photo reprints »

  • Mason Mish, a second grader in Cindy Diemand's class at William E. Norris school in Southampton, sews a quilt in class with "quilt mother" Tammy Walunas on June 14, 2013. The class has made quilts before for various charities and organizations, and these quilts will be sent to Boston Marathon bombing victims and Oklahoma tornado victims.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

    Mason Mish, a second grader in Cindy Diemand's class at William E. Norris school in Southampton, sews a quilt in class with "quilt mother" Tammy Walunas on June 14, 2013. The class has made quilts before for various charities and organizations, and these quilts will be sent to Boston Marathon bombing victims and Oklahoma tornado victims.
    AYRIKA WHITNEY Purchase photo reprints »

  • Riley Smith has a chance to help sew a quilt in Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton on June 14, 2013. The students of Diemand's classes have sewn quilts for charity before with their quilt mother Tammy Walunas. These quilts will be donated to victims of both the Boston Marathon bombing and the recent Oklahoma tornado.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

    Riley Smith has a chance to help sew a quilt in Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton on June 14, 2013. The students of Diemand's classes have sewn quilts for charity before with their quilt mother Tammy Walunas. These quilts will be donated to victims of both the Boston Marathon bombing and the recent Oklahoma tornado.
    AYRIKA WHITNEY Purchase photo reprints »

  • Quilt mother Tammy Walunas prepares squares for a quilt the students of Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton to sew. Diemand has had her students create quilts in the past for charity as a way to give back to the community, and these quilts will be donated to victims of the Boston Marathon bombings.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

    Quilt mother Tammy Walunas prepares squares for a quilt the students of Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton to sew. Diemand has had her students create quilts in the past for charity as a way to give back to the community, and these quilts will be donated to victims of the Boston Marathon bombings.
    AYRIKA WHITNEY Purchase photo reprints »

  • Quilt mother Tammy Walunas prepares squares for a quilt the students of Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton to sew. Diemand has had her students create quilts in the past for charity as a way to give back to the community, and these quilts will be donated to victims of the Boston Marathon bombings.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

    Quilt mother Tammy Walunas prepares squares for a quilt the students of Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton to sew. Diemand has had her students create quilts in the past for charity as a way to give back to the community, and these quilts will be donated to victims of the Boston Marathon bombings.
    AYRIKA WHITNEY Purchase photo reprints »

  • Students in Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton work while Cheyenne Redfern has a turn sewing a quilt with quilt mother Tammy Walunas on June 14, 2013. Diemand's classes have made quilts before to donate to hospitals and charities, but these specific quilts will be donated to Boston Marathon bombing victims. Some might also be donated to victims of the recent Oklahoma tornado.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY
  • Caroline Taylor, a second grader at William E. Norris School in Southampton, sews a quilt with the help of the class' quilt mother, Tammy Walunas, on June 14, 2013. The quilts that the children have been making over the past two weeks will be donated to survivors of the Boston Marathon bombing. Any quilts left over will be sent to survivors of the Oklahoma tornadoes.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY
  • Mason Mish, a second grader in Cindy Diemand's class at William E. Norris school in Southampton, sews a quilt in class with "quilt mother" Tammy Walunas on June 14, 2013. The class has made quilts before for various charities and organizations, and these quilts will be sent to Boston Marathon bombing victims and Oklahoma tornado victims.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY
  • Mason Mish, a second grader in Cindy Diemand's class at William E. Norris school in Southampton, sews a quilt in class with "quilt mother" Tammy Walunas on June 14, 2013. The class has made quilts before for various charities and organizations, and these quilts will be sent to Boston Marathon bombing victims and Oklahoma tornado victims.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY
  • Riley Smith has a chance to help sew a quilt in Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton on June 14, 2013. The students of Diemand's classes have sewn quilts for charity before with their quilt mother Tammy Walunas. These quilts will be donated to victims of both the Boston Marathon bombing and the recent Oklahoma tornado.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY
  • Quilt mother Tammy Walunas prepares squares for a quilt the students of Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton to sew. Diemand has had her students create quilts in the past for charity as a way to give back to the community, and these quilts will be donated to victims of the Boston Marathon bombings.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY
  • Quilt mother Tammy Walunas prepares squares for a quilt the students of Cindy Diemand's second grade class at William E. Norris School in Southampton to sew. Diemand has had her students create quilts in the past for charity as a way to give back to the community, and these quilts will be donated to victims of the Boston Marathon bombings.<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

A second-grade class at the William E. Norris School is using needle and thread to provide a little comfort to the victims of the April 15 Boston Marathon bombing.

Each spring for the last four or five years, Cynthia Diemand’s class has made a quilt as part of the Quilts for Comfort program run by the Southampton Quilts shop on Parc Place.

Norris School students have made quilts for cancer patients and others in need of some comfort, she said. This year, after hearing that Southampton Quilts was working with quilters from around the state to create handmade quilts for the 264 victims of the bombing, Diemand suggested the project to her students.

“We talked to them about what happened in Boston, without going into too much detail, but most of them had heard about it,” she said. “We said we though it was a wonderful way to help those families affected.”

The 15 students agreed and started working on a few quilts with their “quilt mother,” volunteer and quilt maker Tammy Walunas. The squares are still being sewn together but the finished quilts will be ready to donate just before the end of the school year on June 28, Diemand said.

Diemand said her classes learn the historical significance of quilts, as well as about the importance of community service. Plus, they have fun quilting. “They love it,” she said. “Every morning they ask, ‘Is quilting mother coming?’ ”

•••

Fresh and local

People who get food from the First Congregational Church’s Community Cupboard had a pleasant surprise when they stopped by to get the usual groceries June 8. There was fresh produce from a new farm share from Mountain View Farm in Easthampton.

“The people are happy to have the fresh food,” said Luann Archambault, a member of the missions board that runs the food pantry. “They are looking forward to seeing what we have from the farm the next time we are open.”

She said she gets fresh produce for the food pantry when funds allow, but the farm share will consistently provide produce from June through October.

The church purchased the $500 farm share with money raised in a fundraising project that started with Sunday school students ages 4 to 12. Jessica McConnell, the co-coordinator of the school, said the students choose a cause to raise money for each year and she suggested they try to purchase a farm share for the Community Cupboard.

Because the children were too young to put on a fundraising dinner by themselves, they teamed up with Boy Scout Troop 210, with boys ages 12 to 18, which meets in the church. The youth, adult volunteers and Sunday school teachers put on a pasta dinner April 6, serving 139 plates and raising $691. The Robert Floyd Photo Gallery had pledged to match the money raised, and donated another $700. A donated bag of coins brought the total to $1,535.

“It definitely exceeded our expectations,” McConnell said. “We only needed to raise $500, and they raised enough to buy farm shares for this year and the next two years.”

In its first week, the farm share provided greens, broccoli, radishes and other vegetables. McConnell said. “It’s quite a bit of produce,” she said.

Archambault said the local Boy and Girl Scout troops that meet at the church both conduct can drives to help stock the pantry.

The Girl Scouts also plant small vegetable gardens to help provide fresh food for the Community Cupboard.

The pantry is open to anyone in need on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the church.

Rebecca Everett can be reached at reverett@gazettenet.com.

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