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Hampshire County turns out big for Warren, Obama

  • Andrew Baseman and Jenny Reed, both of Northampton, chat during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton. Reed was a volunteer for Obama for America.

    Andrew Baseman and Jenny Reed, both of Northampton, chat during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton. Reed was a volunteer for Obama for America. Purchase photo reprints »

  • Larry Hott, of Florence, Jackie Hayden, of Goshen, and Jaz Tupelo, of Northampton, front row from left, cheer the election results during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton.

    Larry Hott, of Florence, Jackie Hayden, of Goshen, and Jaz Tupelo, of Northampton, front row from left, cheer the election results during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton. Purchase photo reprints »

  • A group of people cheer Tuesday at Hotel Northampton as they learn that Elizabeth Warren defeated Scott Brown in the Massachusetts Senate race.

    A group of people cheer Tuesday at Hotel Northampton as they learn that Elizabeth Warren defeated Scott Brown in the Massachusetts Senate race. Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter Ron Grosslein talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter Ron Grosslein talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter Joan Swift prepares to leave the Bangs Center after casting her ballot Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter Joan Swift prepares to leave the Bangs Center after casting her ballot Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voters wait to cast their ballots in precinct 10 set up in the Glass Room at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voters wait to cast their ballots in precinct 10 set up in the Glass Room at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voters wait in line for two of the three precincts set up at the Bangs Center or the election in November of 2012.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voters wait in line for two of the three precincts set up at the Bangs Center or the election in November of 2012.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Jennifer Dempsey of Amherst, accompanied by her children Emily May, center, 10, and Charlie May, 7, talks to reporter after voting at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Jennifer Dempsey of Amherst, accompanied by her children Emily May, center, 10, and Charlie May, 7, talks to reporter after voting at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Andrew Baseman and Jenny Reed, both of Northampton, chat during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton. Reed was a volunteer for Obama for America.

    Andrew Baseman and Jenny Reed, both of Northampton, chat during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton. Reed was a volunteer for Obama for America. Purchase photo reprints »

  • Larry Hott, of Florence, Jackie Hayden, of Goshen, and Jaz Tupelo, of Northampton, front row from left, cheer the election results during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton.

    Larry Hott, of Florence, Jackie Hayden, of Goshen, and Jaz Tupelo, of Northampton, front row from left, cheer the election results during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton. Purchase photo reprints »

  • A group of people cheer Tuesday at Hotel Northampton as they learn that Elizabeth Warren defeated Scott Brown in the Massachusetts Senate race.

    A group of people cheer Tuesday at Hotel Northampton as they learn that Elizabeth Warren defeated Scott Brown in the Massachusetts Senate race. Purchase photo reprints »

  • Mary Olberding, who won Hampshire County register of deeds, reacts to election results with her daugher, Abigail, 12, Tuesday during a party for democrats at Hotel Northampton.

    Mary Olberding, who won Hampshire County register of deeds, reacts to election results with her daugher, Abigail, 12, Tuesday during a party for democrats at Hotel Northampton. Purchase photo reprints »

  • Mary Olberding, center, who won Hampshire County register of deeds, talks to supporters during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton.

    Mary Olberding, center, who won Hampshire County register of deeds, talks to supporters during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton. Purchase photo reprints »

  • About a dozen cars idled outside of East Meadow School in Granby as voters waited for the town's two precincts to open at 6 a.m. on Tuesday, an hour earlier than in most of the state.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    About a dozen cars idled outside of East Meadow School in Granby as voters waited for the town's two precincts to open at 6 a.m. on Tuesday, an hour earlier than in most of the state.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Only a short time after 6 a.m., Granby residents were already lined up inside East Meadow School to vote.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Only a short time after 6 a.m., Granby residents were already lined up inside East Meadow School to vote.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Business was brisk just after 6 a.m. Tuesday in the cafetorium of Granby's East Meadow School, where both of the town's precincts opened for voters an hour earlier than in most of the state.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Business was brisk just after 6 a.m. Tuesday in the cafetorium of Granby's East Meadow School, where both of the town's precincts opened for voters an hour earlier than in most of the state.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Over 1100 Hadley voters had cast their ballots at Hopkins Academy by 11:30 Tuesday morning.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Over 1100 Hadley voters had cast their ballots at Hopkins Academy by 11:30 Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Hadley voters Hope Noyes, left, and Kurtis Mckemmie brought their son Alex, 3 1/2, with them to Hopkins Academy to cast their ballots Tuesday morning.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Hadley voters Hope Noyes, left, and Kurtis Mckemmie brought their son Alex, 3 1/2, with them to Hopkins Academy to cast their ballots Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Hadley voter Andrew Morris-Friedman n of 45 Roosevelt St., said he is thrilled that every vote matters in this election because of the contest for the U.S. Senate seat. He had just cast his ballot at Hopkins Academy.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Hadley voter Andrew Morris-Friedman n of 45 Roosevelt St., said he is thrilled that every vote matters in this election because of the contest for the U.S. Senate seat. He had just cast his ballot at Hopkins Academy.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voters line up to cast their ballots in three precincts set up at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voters line up to cast their ballots in three precincts set up at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter Alan Root talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter Alan Root talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter Alan Root talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter Alan Root talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter Joan Swift talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter Joan Swift talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter Joan Swift talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter Joan Swift talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Amherst voter William Miller talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Amherst voter William Miller talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Friends and Amherst College first-years Gabrielle Mayer (L) of New York City and Tierney Werner of Oregon asked a stranger at the Bangs Center to photograph them with their "I Voted Today" stickers after they voted for the first time Tuesday. Mayer is a Democrat and Tierney is a Republican.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    Friends and Amherst College first-years Gabrielle Mayer (L) of New York City and Tierney Werner of Oregon asked a stranger at the Bangs Center to photograph them with their "I Voted Today" stickers after they voted for the first time Tuesday. Mayer is a Democrat and Tierney is a Republican.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • University of Massachusetts first-year Sammi Gay of New York talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    University of Massachusetts first-year Sammi Gay of New York talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • Mary Olberding, who won Hampshire County register of deeds, talks to two of her children, Jack, 10, and Ellie, 6, during an election party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton.

    Mary Olberding, who won Hampshire County register of deeds, talks to two of her children, Jack, 10, and Ellie, 6, during an election party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton. Purchase photo reprints »

  • Andrew Baseman and Jenny Reed, both of Northampton, chat during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton. Reed was a volunteer for Obama for America.
  • Larry Hott, of Florence, Jackie Hayden, of Goshen, and Jaz Tupelo, of Northampton, front row from left, cheer the election results during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton.
  • A group of people cheer Tuesday at Hotel Northampton as they learn that Elizabeth Warren defeated Scott Brown in the Massachusetts Senate race.
  • Amherst voter Ron Grosslein talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter Joan Swift prepares to leave the Bangs Center after casting her ballot Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voters wait to cast their ballots in precinct 10 set up in the Glass Room at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voters wait in line for two of the three precincts set up at the Bangs Center or the election in November of 2012.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Jennifer Dempsey of Amherst, accompanied by her children Emily May, center, 10, and Charlie May, 7, talks to reporter after voting at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Andrew Baseman and Jenny Reed, both of Northampton, chat during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton. Reed was a volunteer for Obama for America.
  • Larry Hott, of Florence, Jackie Hayden, of Goshen, and Jaz Tupelo, of Northampton, front row from left, cheer the election results during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton.
  • A group of people cheer Tuesday at Hotel Northampton as they learn that Elizabeth Warren defeated Scott Brown in the Massachusetts Senate race.
  • Mary Olberding, who won Hampshire County register of deeds, reacts to election results with her daugher, Abigail, 12, Tuesday during a party for democrats at Hotel Northampton.
  • Mary Olberding, center, who won Hampshire County register of deeds, talks to supporters during a party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton.
  • About a dozen cars idled outside of East Meadow School in Granby as voters waited for the town's two precincts to open at 6 a.m. on Tuesday, an hour earlier than in most of the state.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Granby residents line up inside East Meadow School just after 6 a.m. on Tuesday to vote in one of the town's two precincts, both located at the school. The polls, by special request from the town of about 6,000, opened an hour earlier than in most of the state and business was brisk as evidenced by a steady flux of about 25 cars in the parking lot.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Only a short time after 6 a.m., Granby residents were already lined up inside East Meadow School to vote.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Business was brisk just after 6 a.m. Tuesday in the cafetorium of Granby's East Meadow School, where both of the town's precincts opened for voters an hour earlier than in most of the state.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Over 1100 Hadley voters had cast their ballots at Hopkins Academy by 11:30 Tuesday morning.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Hadley voters Hope Noyes, left, and Kurtis Mckemmie brought their son Alex, 3 1/2, with them to Hopkins Academy to cast their ballots Tuesday morning.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Hadley voter Andrew Morris-Friedman n of 45 Roosevelt St., said he is thrilled that every vote matters in this election because of the contest for the U.S. Senate seat. He had just cast his ballot at Hopkins Academy.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voters line up to cast their ballots in three precincts set up at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter Alan Root talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter Alan Root talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter Joan Swift talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter Joan Swift talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Amherst voter William Miller talks to reporter after casting his ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Friends and Amherst College first-years Gabrielle Mayer (L) of New York City and Tierney Werner of Oregon asked a stranger at the Bangs Center to photograph them with their "I Voted Today" stickers after they voted for the first time Tuesday. Mayer is a Democrat and Tierney is a Republican.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • University of Massachusetts first-year Sammi Gay of New York talks to reporter after casting her ballot at the Bangs Center Tuesday morning. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • Mary Olberding, who won Hampshire County register of deeds, talks to two of her children, Jack, 10, and Ellie, 6, during an election party for democrats Tuesday at Hotel Northampton.

Hampshire County helped carry Elizabeth Warren to the U.S. Senate Tuesday, backing the Democratic Senate challenger by a wide margin over Republican U.S. Sen. Scott Brown.

The result in the Senate race was mirrored in other contests, with county residents heavily voting for the Democratic ticket.

Every Hampshire County community reporting by press time backed the re-election of President Barack Obama over former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.

It was a similar story for Governor Council’s in the 8th District, where Democrat Michael Albano easily won all communities that had reported.

CLICK HERE for local election returns.

Hampshire County voters also mirrored the state in easily approving Question 3 which legalizes the use of medical marijuana in the state.

The sole area where county voters were divided was on Question 2, which would allow the terminally ill to seek life-ending medication. Voters in Hampshire County approved of the measure by about a two-to-one margin. The outcome of the question statewide was undetermined at press time. See Gazettenet for the latest numbers.

Most of the focus was on the Senate contest between Brown and Warren.

At the Hotel Northampton where local Democrats gathered, a large cheer went up as NBC news called the race in Warren’s favor. With her victory, Warren becomes the first woman to win a statewide election for governor or Senate.

Leigh Merriam of Northampton was among the happiest in the crowd. Merriam joined the Warren campaign in the “late spring, early summer,” serving as the Ward 4 Precinct chairman of her get-out-the vote effort in Northampton.

Warren organizers met in the city every Tuesday over the course of the summer and fall to plan outreach efforts, he said.

“It’s been a long summer,” Merriam said, noting that he donated his wife’s coffee maker to the campaign.

But he said the effort was worth it.

“I’ve got a 2-year-old daughter and I don’t want to see Roe v. Wade overturned,” Merriam said.

Kate Crowther, a Warren volunteer from Northampton, said enthusiasm for the Harvard Law School professor built as voters got to know her better.

“At first people wanted to get Scott Brown out,” she said. “Over time, it became we want Elizabeth Warren in.”

In beating Brown, Warren replicated the winning coalition assembled by Gov. Deval Patrick, who won urban areas and western Massachusetts in 2006 and 2010, while also winning a majority female voters.

The Warren campaign made a concerted effort to appeal to those constituencies in the run-up to Tuesday, looking to drive up turnout in heavily Democratic communities like Amherst and Northampton to offset loses in Republican-leaning communities in southeastern and northeastern Massachusetts.

The pair delivered.

In Northampton, Mike LaRiviere did a double-take when he reported for duty as a voting warden at JFK Middle School early Tuesday.

“People were waiting outside at 6:45 when I got here,” said LaRiviere, the Ward 7 voting warden. “That’s never happened before.”

Ultimately, 78 percent of Northampton voters cast a ballot, favoring Warren by an 81 percent to 18 percent margin over Brown. In Amherst, 66 percent of registered voters cast a ballot, preferring Warren by an 80 to 20 percent margin.

Warren’s victory was also notable locally because she won South Hadley and Westhampton which voted for Brown in the 2010 special election.

In Hampshire County, Brown prevailed only in Huntington, Granby and Ware.

A University of Massachusetts Amherst exit poll suggested Warren owed much of her victory to women and new voters.

Brown retained support among those who backed him in 2010, but lost those didn’t vote in that election and cast a ballot Tuesday by 20 points.

The Republican senator also lost heavily among female voters, with women backing Warren by a 60 to 40 percent margin, according to the poll.

Brian Schaffner, a UMass associate professor of political science, said that after the economy, women’s issue were of most concern to voters. Some 51 percent of respondents in the exit polling said that the issue of abortion was very important for their vote, while 61 percent reported that equal pay was very important, the exit poll found.

“I think when she focused the dialogue of the race on women’s issues she started to gain traction,” Schaffner said.

Ralph Whitehead, a journalism professor at UMass and longtime observer of state politics, said the last debate in Springfield may have provided the pivotal moment in the campaign. It was there that Warren argued Brown had failed the state’s women by voting against equal work for equal pay legislation, a pro-choice Supreme Court nominee from Massachusetts and in favor of a measure that would have restricted access to contraception.

“That set of valid assertions about Brown’s record was crisp and powerful,” Whitehead said.

A first-time candidate, Warren was a prodigious fundraiser collecting $39 million in donations since entering the campaign in the fall of 2011.

“A lot of the women who have run for statewide office in Massachusetts — Shannon O’Brien or Evelyn Murphy — had a fundraising disadvantage. This was not just a victory for a female candidate, this was a victory of an extremely well-financed female candidate,” Whitehead said. “And that is a credit to her that she was able to attract that type of financial support.”

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