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Wyden cites contradiction in eavesdropping answer

  • This photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, on Sunday, June 9, 2013, in Hong Kong. The Guardian identified Snowden as a source for its reports on intelligence programs after he asked the newspaper to do so on Sunday. (AP Photo/The Guardian)

    This photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, on Sunday, June 9, 2013, in Hong Kong. The Guardian identified Snowden as a source for its reports on intelligence programs after he asked the newspaper to do so on Sunday. (AP Photo/The Guardian) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Glenn Greenwald, a reporter of Britain's The Guardian newspaper, speaks to The Associated Press in Hong Kong Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Greenwald, the journalist who interviewed Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old contractor who allowed himself to be revealed as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs, said he had been in touch with Snowden, but declined to say whether he was still in Hong Kong and said he didn’t know what his future plans were. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

    Glenn Greenwald, a reporter of Britain's The Guardian newspaper, speaks to The Associated Press in Hong Kong Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Greenwald, the journalist who interviewed Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old contractor who allowed himself to be revealed as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs, said he had been in touch with Snowden, but declined to say whether he was still in Hong Kong and said he didn’t know what his future plans were. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Glenn Greenwald, left, a reporter for The Guardian newspaper, walks out from his hotel room in Hong Kong Monday, June 10, 2013. Greenwald reported a 29-year-old contractor who claims to have worked at the National Security Agency and the CIA allowed himself to be revealed Sunday as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs, risking prosecution by the U.S. government. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

    Glenn Greenwald, left, a reporter for The Guardian newspaper, walks out from his hotel room in Hong Kong Monday, June 10, 2013. Greenwald reported a 29-year-old contractor who claims to have worked at the National Security Agency and the CIA allowed himself to be revealed Sunday as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs, risking prosecution by the U.S. government. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Glenn Greenwald, a reporter of Britain's The Guardian newspaper, speaks to The Associated Press in Hong Kong Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Greenwald, the journalist who interviewed Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old contractor who allowed himself to be revealed as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs, said he had been in touch with Snowden, but declined to say whether he was still in Hong Kong and said he didn’t know what his future plans were. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

    Glenn Greenwald, a reporter of Britain's The Guardian newspaper, speaks to The Associated Press in Hong Kong Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Greenwald, the journalist who interviewed Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old contractor who allowed himself to be revealed as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs, said he had been in touch with Snowden, but declined to say whether he was still in Hong Kong and said he didn’t know what his future plans were. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) Purchase photo reprints »

  • Glenn Greenwald, right, a reporter for The Guardian newspaper, speaks to media at a hotel in Hong Kong Monday, June 10, 2013. Greenwald spoke about his interview with Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old contractor who allowed himself to be revealed as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

    Glenn Greenwald, right, a reporter for The Guardian newspaper, speaks to media at a hotel in Hong Kong Monday, June 10, 2013. Greenwald spoke about his interview with Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old contractor who allowed himself to be revealed as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu) Purchase photo reprints »

  • FILE - In this June 6, 2013 file photo National Security Agency plaques are seen at the compound at Fort Meade, Md. The NSA was founded in 1952 but only publicly acknowledged years later, which explains its nickname “No Such Agency.”

    FILE - In this June 6, 2013 file photo National Security Agency plaques are seen at the compound at Fort Meade, Md. The NSA was founded in 1952 but only publicly acknowledged years later, which explains its nickname “No Such Agency.” Purchase photo reprints »

  • This photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, on Sunday, June 9, 2013, in Hong Kong. The Guardian identified Snowden as a source for its reports on intelligence programs after he asked the newspaper to do so on Sunday. (AP Photo/The Guardian)
  • Glenn Greenwald, a reporter of Britain's The Guardian newspaper, speaks to The Associated Press in Hong Kong Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Greenwald, the journalist who interviewed Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old contractor who allowed himself to be revealed as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs, said he had been in touch with Snowden, but declined to say whether he was still in Hong Kong and said he didn’t know what his future plans were. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • Glenn Greenwald, left, a reporter for The Guardian newspaper, walks out from his hotel room in Hong Kong Monday, June 10, 2013. Greenwald reported a 29-year-old contractor who claims to have worked at the National Security Agency and the CIA allowed himself to be revealed Sunday as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs, risking prosecution by the U.S. government. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • Glenn Greenwald, a reporter of Britain's The Guardian newspaper, speaks to The Associated Press in Hong Kong Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Greenwald, the journalist who interviewed Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old contractor who allowed himself to be revealed as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs, said he had been in touch with Snowden, but declined to say whether he was still in Hong Kong and said he didn’t know what his future plans were. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • Glenn Greenwald, right, a reporter for The Guardian newspaper, speaks to media at a hotel in Hong Kong Monday, June 10, 2013. Greenwald spoke about his interview with Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old contractor who allowed himself to be revealed as the source of disclosures about the U.S. government's secret surveillance programs. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • FILE - In this June 6, 2013 file photo National Security Agency plaques are seen at the compound at Fort Meade, Md. The NSA was founded in 1952 but only publicly acknowledged years later, which explains its nickname “No Such Agency.”

WASHINGTON — Sen. Ron Wyden says Director of National Intelligence James Clapper had a day to prepare his answer to Congress that there was no widespread collection of Americans’ phone records.

Clapper, in answer to Wyden’s questions in March testimony, denied that any intentional and massive sweep of Americans phone records as part of counterterror surveillance was occurring. It was revealed in the last week that two such programs do exist and were recently renewed.

In a statement to The Associated Press, Wyden said when NSA Director Keith Alexander didn’t provide a full answer to questions about the programs, Wyden gave Clapper a day’s notice that he would be asked the question at the hearing. Afterwards, he said, he gave Clapper’s office another chance to amend his answer, but Clapper declined.

A spokesman for Clapper’s office could not immediately be reached.

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