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Branching out

  • At top, Amy Papineau, a research assistant in Nursery and Landscape Horticulture at the University of New Hampshire, uses an air spade to blow the dirt from a tree root ball to be studied by a group of University of Massachusetts Environmental Conservation students visiting Amherst Nurseries on Wednesday.<br/>At right, UMass Stockbridge School of Agriculture senior Conor Laffey examines the root system of a young oak tree during a talk by Cathy Neal, an extension professor at the University of New Hampshire.<br/>Above, John Kinchla of Amherst Nurseries uses a tree spade to harvest a young oak tree during students' field trip.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    At top, Amy Papineau, a research assistant in Nursery and Landscape Horticulture at the University of New Hampshire, uses an air spade to blow the dirt from a tree root ball to be studied by a group of University of Massachusetts Environmental Conservation students visiting Amherst Nurseries on Wednesday.
    At right, UMass Stockbridge School of Agriculture senior Conor Laffey examines the root system of a young oak tree during a talk by Cathy Neal, an extension professor at the University of New Hampshire.
    Above, John Kinchla of Amherst Nurseries uses a tree spade to harvest a young oak tree during students' field trip.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • University of Massachusetts Stockbridge School of Agriculture senior Conor Laffey examines the root system of a young oak tree at Amherst Nurseries during a talk by Cathy Neal, an Extension Professor in Nursery and Landscape Horticulture at the University of New Hampshire. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    University of Massachusetts Stockbridge School of Agriculture senior Conor Laffey examines the root system of a young oak tree at Amherst Nurseries during a talk by Cathy Neal, an Extension Professor in Nursery and Landscape Horticulture at the University of New Hampshire.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • John Kinchla of Amherst Nurseries uses a tree spade to harvest a young oak tree as University of Massachusetts Environmental Conservation students watch during a field trip Wednesday.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

    John Kinchla of Amherst Nurseries uses a tree spade to harvest a young oak tree as University of Massachusetts Environmental Conservation students watch during a field trip Wednesday.
    KEVIN GUTTING Purchase photo reprints »

  • At top, Amy Papineau, a research assistant in Nursery and Landscape Horticulture at the University of New Hampshire, uses an air spade to blow the dirt from a tree root ball to be studied by a group of University of Massachusetts Environmental Conservation students visiting Amherst Nurseries on Wednesday.<br/>At right, UMass Stockbridge School of Agriculture senior Conor Laffey examines the root system of a young oak tree during a talk by Cathy Neal, an extension professor at the University of New Hampshire.<br/>Above, John Kinchla of Amherst Nurseries uses a tree spade to harvest a young oak tree during students' field trip.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • University of Massachusetts Stockbridge School of Agriculture senior Conor Laffey examines the root system of a young oak tree at Amherst Nurseries during a talk by Cathy Neal, an Extension Professor in Nursery and Landscape Horticulture at the University of New Hampshire. <br/>KEVIN GUTTING
  • John Kinchla of Amherst Nurseries uses a tree spade to harvest a young oak tree as University of Massachusetts Environmental Conservation students watch during a field trip Wednesday.<br/>KEVIN GUTTING

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