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A little snow in the Valley, plenty in the Hilltowns

  • Ian Newton of Williamsburg shovels his Main Street driveway March 13, 2018 as large snowflakes continue to fall. "I'm clearing the first layer off, so that way it's easier later," said Newton of his method. "I'm ready for spring." —GAZETTE STAFF/SARAH CROSBY

  • Izabella Morin,4, of Easthampton, shovels snow at Florence Heights Monday. —CAROL LOLLIS

  • Pamela Cobb stands on a ladder to place a hat on a snowman she made with her daughter, Elsie Baker, 12, left, and a neighborhood friend, Audrey Quinn, 13, at her home on Upland Road in Leeds, Tuesday, March 13, 2018. She said they were about to go to the D.A.R. State Forest in Goshen, but got sidetracked by the packing consistency of the snow. "It was too good to pass up," she said. The bottom section of the 7-foot-tall snowman was rolled from the backyard to the front yard. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Audrey Quinn, 13, stands on a ladder to place a mouth on a snowman she made with her friend, Elsie Baker, 12, and Pamela Cobb, Elsie's mother, at Cobb's home on Upland Road in Leeds, Tuesday, March 13, 2018. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Pamela Cobb places an eye on a snowman she made with he daughter, Elsie Baker, 12, standing on a ladder, and a neighborhood friend, Audrey Quinn, 13, at her home on Upland Road in Leeds, Tuesday, March 13, 2018. She said they were about to go to the D.A.R. State Forest in Goshen, but got sidetracked by the packing consistency of the snow. "It was too good to pass up," she said. The bottom section of the 7-foot-tall snowman was rolled from the backyard to the front yard. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • A group of people wait for a bus during a snowstorm Tuesday, March, 13, 2018 on Main Street in Northampton. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Liam Papillon, 10, of Westhampton, right, works with his mother Melissa to clear snow from the post office entrance March 13, 2018 on Main Street in Goshen. "It's our third time shoveling this area, today," said Melissa Papillon. —GAZETTE STAFF/SARAH CROSBY

  • Snow-covered trees create a winter scene at 4 Fomer Road in Southampton during a snowstorm Tuesday, March 13, 2018. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Karl Ferron, of Baltimore, puts the finishing touches on a snowman on Main Street in Easthampton, during a snowstorm Tuesday, March 13, 2018. He is in town visiting his sister-in-law, Mattiebyrd McRist. He began making the snowman with his daughter, Karah, 5, but it was too cold for her. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Eddie Benton steps down from his truck after adding water to its radiator before heading out from the Southampton Highway Department garage on Fomer Road during a snowstorm, Tuesday, March 13, 2018. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • A swing hanging from a tree at 127 College Highway in Southampton reminds us of warmer days during a snowstorm Tuesday, March 13, 2018. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Aidan Putnam-Dean, of Northampton, walks by a sign at Big E's Supermarket in Easthampton that reminds us spring will start next week, during a snowstorm Tuesday, March 13, 2018. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Alexandra Neal, above, walks with Flicker at Pleasant Green in Easthampton, Tuesday. She was dog-sitting for Flicker, who belongs to Integra Sinclair, who lives nearby. Below, Aidan Putnam-Dean, of Northampton, walks by a sign Tuesday at Big E's Supermarket in Easthampton that reminds us spring will start next week. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS PHOTO

  • A driveway for Geeleher Enterprises at 39 College Highway in Southampton provides a festive winter scene during a snowstorm, Tuesday, March 13, 2018. —GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS



@dustyc123
Wednesday, March 14, 2018

NORTHAMPTON — The third powerful nor’easter in two weeks slammed the Northeast on Tuesday, bringing blizzard conditions and more than a foot of snow to some communities and knocking out power to tens of thousands of homes and businesses.

High winds and blowing snow led meteorologists to categorize the storm as a blizzard in parts of New England, including Boston. By afternoon, power outages climbed to more than 250,000 in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut.

In western Massachusetts, snowfall totals varied greatly from town to town. While the I-91 corridor was largely spared the brunt of the storm, those living in the hilltowns saw snowfall totals reach a foot and above.

There was 18 inches of snow in Goshen as of 6:50 p.m., whereas in Amherst barely 4 inches had fallen by late afternoon, according to unofficial observations compiled by the National Weather Service.

In Plainfield, around a foot of snow kept the town’s plows running all day, according to Assistant Fire Chief David Alvord.

“It’s an amazing difference just coming up Route 9 from Williamsburg to Goshen,” Alvord said early Tuesday evening.

“There’s a lot of snow out there,” Judi Morin said from the Goshen General Store. Morin said she heard of measurements edging closer to 20 inches near George Propane on Berkshire Trail, but said the snow didn’t worry her too much.

“I’ll make it home,” she said. “I’ve got all-wheel and studs.”

That snowfall was a stark contrast to Easthampton, where local weather spotter Sally Peters said on Twitter that she measured only 3 inches of snow Tuesday evening.

The storm was expected to last through most of Tuesday, with light snow continuing in some areas overnight and into Wednesday.

The snowy conditions did disrupt road and air travel. The flight-tracking site FlightAware reported 133 canceled flights out of Bradley International Airport on Tuesday, and speed restrictions were in place for much of the day on the Massachusetts Turnpike.

On I-91, a tractor-trailer jackknifed going north just after 9 a.m. near the Deerfield-Whately town line, closing down the northbound lanes north of Exit 24, state police reported.

In parts of western Massachusetts, though, some municipalities that were less affected began returning to normal by Tuesday evening or earlier, lifting parking bans and reopening roads. Whereas school districts were closed on Tuesday, there were no reported closures for Wednesday.

The eastern and central parts of the state were hit the hardest, with far more than a foot of snow measured in parts of Worcester and Middlesex counties, as well as in parts of New Hampshire, Maine, Connecticut and Rhode Island.

In New Hampshire, the National Weather Service said 25 inches of snow was reported Tuesday evening near Derry.

Franklin, Massachusetts, received 23 inches, East Killingly, Connecticut, 20 inches, and Kezar Falls, Maine, 20 inches.

Boston’s usually packed subway trains were nearly empty as many workers stayed home and schools closed. Amtrak suspended all service Tuesday between Boston and New York City. Gov. Charlie Baker announced a delayed start time on Wednesday for non-emergency state executive branch employees.

Material from the Associated Press was used in this report.

Dusty Christensen can be reached at dchristensen@gazettenet.com.