Daily Hampshire Gazette - Established 1786
Lsno/fog
33°
Lsno/fog
Hi 35° | Lo 20°

BRIEFS

  • FILE-In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of resident in Washington. Combined results released Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug called solanezumab, under development by Eli Lilly & Co., suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

    FILE-In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of resident in Washington. Combined results released Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug called solanezumab, under development by Eli Lilly & Co., suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File) Purchase photo reprints »

  • FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of a resident in Washington. Combined results released Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug called solanezumab, under development by Eli Lilly & Co., suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

    FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of a resident in Washington. Combined results released Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug called solanezumab, under development by Eli Lilly & Co., suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File) Purchase photo reprints »

  • FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of a resident in Washington. Combined results released Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug called solanezumab, under development by Eli Lilly & Co., suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

    FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of a resident in Washington. Combined results released Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug called solanezumab, under development by Eli Lilly & Co., suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File) Purchase photo reprints »

  • FILE-In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, laughs with resident Catherine Peake, in Washington. Combined results released, Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug under development by Eli Lilly & Co. called solanezumab, suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. Taken separately, the studies missed their main goals to significantly slow the mind-robbing disease. But pooled results found 34 percent less decline in mild Alzheimer's patients compared to those on a dummy treatment for 18 months. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

    FILE-In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, laughs with resident Catherine Peake, in Washington. Combined results released, Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug under development by Eli Lilly & Co. called solanezumab, suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. Taken separately, the studies missed their main goals to significantly slow the mind-robbing disease. But pooled results found 34 percent less decline in mild Alzheimer's patients compared to those on a dummy treatment for 18 months. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) Purchase photo reprints »

  • FILE-In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, laughs with resident Catherine Peake, in Washington. Combined results released, Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug under development by Eli Lilly & Co. called solanezumab, suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. Taken separately, the studies missed their main goals to significantly slow the mind-robbing disease. But pooled results found 34 percent less decline in mild Alzheimer's patients compared to those on a dummy treatment for 18 months. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

    FILE-In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, laughs with resident Catherine Peake, in Washington. Combined results released, Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug under development by Eli Lilly & Co. called solanezumab, suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. Taken separately, the studies missed their main goals to significantly slow the mind-robbing disease. But pooled results found 34 percent less decline in mild Alzheimer's patients compared to those on a dummy treatment for 18 months. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) Purchase photo reprints »

  • FILE-In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of resident in Washington. Combined results released Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug called solanezumab, under development by Eli Lilly & Co., suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
  • FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of a resident in Washington. Combined results released Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug called solanezumab, under development by Eli Lilly & Co., suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
  • FILE - In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of a resident in Washington. Combined results released Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug called solanezumab, under development by Eli Lilly & Co., suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
  • FILE-In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, laughs with resident Catherine Peake, in Washington. Combined results released, Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug under development by Eli Lilly & Co. called solanezumab, suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. Taken separately, the studies missed their main goals to significantly slow the mind-robbing disease. But pooled results found 34 percent less decline in mild Alzheimer's patients compared to those on a dummy treatment for 18 months. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  • FILE-In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2012, file photo, Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, laughs with resident Catherine Peake, in Washington. Combined results released, Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, from two studies of an experimental Alzheimer's drug under development by Eli Lilly & Co. called solanezumab, suggest that it might modestly slow mental decline, especially in patients with mild disease. Taken separately, the studies missed their main goals to significantly slow the mind-robbing disease. But pooled results found 34 percent less decline in mild Alzheimer's patients compared to those on a dummy treatment for 18 months. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Alzheimer drug shows promise in mild disease

Taken separately, the studies on the drug — Eli Lilly & Co.’s solanezumab — missed their main goals of significantly slowing the mind-robbing disease or improving activities of daily living. But pooled results found 34 percent less mental decline in mild Alzheimer’s patients compared to those on a fake treatment for 18 months.

Doctors called the results encouraging although probably not good enough to win approval of the drug now, without another study to confirm there is a benefit. Investors were more enthused, driving Lilly’s stock up about 5 percent on Monday and about 19 percent since August, when the company described the results in general terms.

Detailed results were revealed for the first time Monday at an American Neurological Association conference in Boston.

“It’s certainly not the home run we all wanted, but we’re very encouraged by these results,” said Maria Carillo, chief science officer for the Alzheimer’s Association, which had no role in the research.

Dr. Stephen Salloway, an Alzheimer’s expert at Brown University, agreed.

“It’s exciting to see that there may be clinical benefit,” but it is modest and may not make a difference in how well patients live — what matters most to them and their families, he said.

Study: Many drugs fine years after they ‘expire’

If you’ve wondered whether medicines really do need to be tossed after their expiration date, you’ve got some company at the California Poison Control System, the University of California, San Francisco, and UC Irvine. Researchers from those institutions decided to satisfy their curiosity by testing the effectiveness of eight drugs that had been sitting around, unopened, in pharmacies for years after they had supposedly gone bad. These drugs were a full 28 to 40 years past their official expiration dates.

The tablets and capsules were dissolved and subjected to chemical analysis using a mass spectrometer. That revealed how much of the active ingredients remained in the pills.

Out of the 14 active ingredients, 12 were still at high enough concentration — 90 percent of the amount stated on the label — to qualify as having “acceptable potency,” the researchers found. The only active ingredients that missed that cutoff were aspirin and amphetamine.

— Los Angeles Times

Legacy Comments0
There are no comments yet. Be the first!
Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.