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New eatery, King Street Eats, hopes to bring 'world street food' concept to Northampton

  • King Street Eats, located at 225 King Street in Northampton, opened about a week and offers a wide variety of food<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

    King Street Eats, located at 225 King Street in Northampton, opened about a week and offers a wide variety of food
    AYRIKA WHITNEY Purchase photo reprints »

  • King Street Eats, located at 225 King Street in Northampton, opened about a week and offers a wide variety of food<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

    King Street Eats, located at 225 King Street in Northampton, opened about a week and offers a wide variety of food
    AYRIKA WHITNEY Purchase photo reprints »

  • King Street Eats, located at 225 King Street in Northampton, opened about a week and offers a wide variety of food<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

    King Street Eats, located at 225 King Street in Northampton, opened about a week and offers a wide variety of food
    AYRIKA WHITNEY Purchase photo reprints »

  • King Street Eats, located at 225 King Street in Northampton, opened about a week and offers a wide variety of food<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY
  • King Street Eats, located at 225 King Street in Northampton, opened about a week and offers a wide variety of food<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY
  • King Street Eats, located at 225 King Street in Northampton, opened about a week and offers a wide variety of food<br/>AYRIKA WHITNEY

King Street Eats, which opened earlier this month in the former Spoleto Express spot at 225 King St., features a menu of sandwiches, salads and other lunch items inspired in part by food from around the world.

Chef John Peter Wentworth said the fast-food restaurant aims to offer quality foods at fair prices — a kind of trip around the “world street” food stands under one roof. This world concept is reflected in the restaurant’s logo featuring maps of countries in the form of a globe.

“Most continents are represented now and we are just getting started,” Wentworth said. “A lot of thought has gone into it.”

He said the menu will continue to develop based on customer feedback and suggestions and his own research. For now, the restaurant offers a host of sandwiches including a Bahn Mi, a Franco-Vietnamise sandwich; an Israel-inspired falafel and sabich sandwich, a Mexican sandwich called a torta and a Cuban.

Future additions will be based on food from South Africa, India and Korea, to name a few. The restaurant also offers closer-to-home items including fish and chips, pastrami and barbecue sandwiches.

Most sandwiches are $7, aside from a New York-style hot dog for $3 and a lobster roll for $12. Salads range from $5 to $9, depending on the size and type, and the restaurant also includes a handful of small plate items.

Wentworth said the restaurant concept, something akin to an indoor version of the street truck movement, is something he’s been thinking about for awhile while working as a chef at Tully O’Reilly’s Pub downtown. Tully McColgan, who owns Tully O’Reilly’s, also liked the idea and when the space opened up on King Street they decided to move ahead. McColgan and his wife own the restaurant.

“The truck food movement is a way to get fresh food fast from different countries,” he said. “I’ve thought it was a good concept for awhile and I feel lucky that I work for people who support the idea.”

King Street Eats will use fresh local ingredients whenever possible.

The restaurant’s location on a stretch of King Street that is experiencing a flurry of new growth is also something that Wentworth hopes will prove advantageous. The restaurant is located near the entrance to the Potpourri Mall and a new Walgreen’s store.

“We want to be a part of serving the community here,” Wentworth said.

Additionally, unlike many downtown locations, parking will not be an issue as the site has its own parking lot.

Among the 25-seat restaurant’s seven employees is Molly Block, who managed Spoleto Express for years before it closed in January. Wentworth said having an experienced and familiar face behind the counter is good for the restaurant.

“It’s very important for us to have her help bridge this change,” he said.

Meantime, Robert Edmund has taken over as the new chef at Tully O’Reilly’s, where Wentworth said he is bringing a southern flair to the menu with more Irish and “comfort” foods.

Legacy Comments4

I think burger chef was where KFC is now... btw, I think it's not accurate to refer to Walgreen's as "new" still

I will be shocked if this restaurant is open two years from now. Then again, I was shocked when Spoleto Express hung on as long as it did.

Wasn't this originally the Burger Chef building? It was either this or what became Hess next door. The old King Street - shopping at Bradlees - the Newstand - Paysavers - Caldors. They are all gone. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDGnmxkGj3o

Sounds great! Website with menu would be helpful.

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