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Hadley dairy names calf for Boston bombing victim

  • Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.<br/><br/>JERREY ROBERTS

    Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.

    JERREY ROBERTS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Bruce Jenkins stands with Martin, a calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings, at Maple Valley Farm in Hadley Monday. The calf is named after Martin Richard, an 8-year-old who was killed.<br/>JERREY ROBERTS

    Bruce Jenkins stands with Martin, a calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings, at Maple Valley Farm in Hadley Monday. The calf is named after Martin Richard, an 8-year-old who was killed.
    JERREY ROBERTS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.<br/>JERREY ROBERTS

    Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.
    JERREY ROBERTS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.<br/>JERREY ROBERTS

    Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.
    JERREY ROBERTS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.<br/>JERREY ROBERTS

    Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.
    JERREY ROBERTS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Bruce Jenkins stands with Martin, a calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings, at Maple Valley Farm in Hadley Monday. The calf is named after Martin Richard, an 8-year-old who was killed. <br/>JERREY ROBERTS

    Bruce Jenkins stands with Martin, a calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings, at Maple Valley Farm in Hadley Monday. The calf is named after Martin Richard, an 8-year-old who was killed.
    JERREY ROBERTS Purchase photo reprints »

  • Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.<br/><br/>JERREY ROBERTS
  • Bruce Jenkins stands with Martin, a calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings, at Maple Valley Farm in Hadley Monday. The calf is named after Martin Richard, an 8-year-old who was killed.<br/>JERREY ROBERTS
  • Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.<br/>JERREY ROBERTS
  • Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.<br/>JERREY ROBERTS
  • Bruce Jenkins of Maple Valley Farm in Hadley says this calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings was named after Martin Richard, the 8-year-old who was killed.<br/>JERREY ROBERTS
  • Bruce Jenkins stands with Martin, a calf born last Monday on the day of the Boston Marathon bombings, at Maple Valley Farm in Hadley Monday. The calf is named after Martin Richard, an 8-year-old who was killed. <br/>JERREY ROBERTS

“Every time we have a calf born on the farm, we take suggestions on what the name should be,” said Maple Valley Creamery owner Bruce Jenks. “We had a lot of suggestions like ‘Patriot’ and ‘Strong,’ but it was the 4-H kids that suggested the name Martin” for Martin Richard, one of three people fatally injured in the explosions.

Jenks sponsors a nine-member 4-H dairy club with creamery co-owner Laurie Cuevas.

“We thought it was a nice way to reach out and show support,” Jenks said. “Rather than focusing on the bombing and the investigation, we just wanted to focus on the victim and do something positive so we can move forward together with hope.”

Jenks said that while the Richard family was not contacted about the decision to name the calf in honor of their son, the members of the 4-H group hoped the family would see publicity about the naming and find some comfort in the story.

According to Jenks, Maple Valley Creamery makes many deliveries to Boston and the greater Boston area.

“I was actually delivering ice cream to Jamaica Plain the day of the bombing,” he said.

Jenks said the creamery posted the calf’s name and the story on its Facebook page late last week. By Sunday, it had more than 7,000 hits with almost 50 people sharing the link.

“It is heartwarming to see people being so supportive,” Jenks said. “Visitors have been coming by the farm to see the calf and some have been leaving flowers at the barn.”

Maple Valley Creamery is a small dairy farm on Mill Valley Road that typically raises female Brown Swiss cows, frequently selling bull calves to petting zoos and individuals with oxen teams. Because of his noteworthy birthday, Martin will remain at the farm.

“He is big, beautiful and healthy. He will be staying here with us and I’m sure we will spoil the heck out of him,” Jenks said.

According to Jenks, the new calf’s name is not his only distinction.

“Most of the calves are born a gray to brown color, but Martin is pretty rare because he is all white,” he said.

While the Brown Swiss breed can weigh 2,000 to 2,500 pounds, and Jenks said they have an easygoing temperament.

“These cows are very friendly and visitors are always welcome to the farm,” Jenks said, adding that people are asked not to feed the new calf.

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