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Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters open Main Street location in Northampton

  • A latte made by Annabelle Lytle-Rich at the newest Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters, located at 273 Main Street in Northampton, on Tuesday, September 19, 2017. —GAZETTE STAFF / KEVIN GUTTING

  • Annabelle Lytle-Rich makes a latte at the newest Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters, located at 273 Main Street in Northampton, on Tuesday, September 19, 2017. —GAZETTE STAFF / KEVIN GUTTING

  • Annabelle Lytle-Rich makes a latte at the newest Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters, located at 273 Main St. in Northampton, on Tuesday. GAZETTE STAFF / KEVIN GUTTING

  • Annabelle Lytle-Rich pours a latte at the newest Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters, located at 273 Main Street in Northampton, on Tuesday, September 19, 2017. —GAZETTE STAFF / KEVIN GUTTING

  • Annabelle Lytle-Rich pours a latte at the newest Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters, located at 273 Main Street in Northampton, on Tuesday, September 19, 2017. —GAZETTE STAFF / KEVIN GUTTING

  • Rosalind Lytle-Rich, left, takes an order from Matt Durand of Northampton, one of the first-day customers at the new Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters, at 273 Main Street in Northampton, on Tuesday, September 19, 2017. —GAZETTE STAFF / KEVIN GUTTING


@BeraDunau
Thursday, September 21, 2017

NORTHAMPTON — Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters opened its seventh location, and second location in the city, on 273 Main St. on Tuesday.

“We thought this was a great location,” said Curtis Rich, who co-founded Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters, a coffee bean roasting and coffee shop business, with his wife Kathy Lytle in the early 1990s.

The general manager for Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters is none-other than one of the couple’s daughters, Annabelle Lytle-Rich, 29, who has been managing the entire company for the last four years.

“I’ve been with it since I was 2,” said Lytle-Rich. “It’s a big family business.”

“She grew up in the business,” said Rich.

Prior to taking on her current role, Lytle-Rich worked as an elementary school teacher.

“That was a lot of management experience,” said Lytle-Rich

Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters already has a site on 124 King St., which Lytle-Rich said will be staying in operation, as the building is owned by the company.

“We have a great business at our King Street store,” said Lytle-Rich. “We’ve got a big following there.”

However, that space has no seating, which was a major reason given for expanding onto Main Street. The new space allows the shop to be part of the downtown community and to be closer to Smith College.

The Main Street location will be providing the same menu as the company’s six other coffee shops, although it will be the only shop offering nitro coffee.

Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters will join a plethora of coffee and breakfast places on Main Street, including Haymarket Cafe, The Green Bean and Starbucks. Indeed, the location itself was formerly occupied by a Dunkin’ Donuts, which Lytle-Rich said meant that it already had much of the infrastructure in place to establish a coffee shop.

An edge that Lytle-Rich noted that Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters has is its selection of flavored coffees. She said that each shop brews three flavors of hot coffee and two flavors of cold brew every day, from a rotating selection of 10-12 offerings.

“Toasted coconut cream is our biggest heavy hitter,” she said.

Lytle-Rich also said that the company is known for its “fun” drinks, such as a local apple cider slushy and pumpkin-spice lattes with syrup made from scratch. Additionally, she noted the shop’s breakfast sandwiches, baked goods, and espresso bar.

The store manager for the Main Street location will be Carolynn Genereux. Genereux started with the company about three years ago as a part-timer at its Easthampton location, and was previously the assistant manager at the Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters in Hadley. This will be the first store that she’ll be managing.

“I’m super excited,” she said.

Indeed, all the managers at the Shelburne Falls Coffee Roasters stores are women currently, and Lytle-Rich said that a lot of trust and autonomy is placed in the company’s managers.

“Everyone’s queen of their castle,” said Lytle-Rich.

The titles that Lytle-Rich gave herself, meanwhile, were a bit less grand.

“The carrier of toasters,” she said. “The mover of microwaves.”

One crucial element that the shop does not have yet is a sign, and Lytle-Rich said that a number of different options are being weighed for it.

“We want to make sure … it looks great,” said Lytle-Rich.