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Elaine Fronhofer: Urges Senate to vote against Republican tax bill

  • mactrunk


Sunday, November 26, 2017
Urges Senate to vote against Republican tax bill

Last week, the U.S. House passed the Republican tax bill on a partisan vote just two weeks after it was introduced.

The Senate is on track to vote on its 400-plus page bill by next week. By comparison, the last similarly major tax-code overhaul (under President Reagan) took years to develop and pass.

Why the rush now? Because the current tax bill is so bad that it needs to get passed before citizens have time to digest it and demand it be voted down.

But a lot is at stake in this vote. Indeed, defeating this bill is urgent to protect our democracy. The stability of any democracy depends upon there being a viable middle class. Democracies need to have a majority of citizens who are educated, engaged, and able to participate as active citizens because they believe it will matter.

The danger we face is that income inequality in America today is the worst it’s been since the early 1900s when industry magnates amassed vast fortunes while paying subsistence wages to their workers.

Today, citizens rightly perceive the system is rigged in favor of those at the top and that elected officials answer only to their wealthy donors. Donald Trump campaigned on this problem and the promise to correct it.

But this tax bill does the exact opposite. Eighty cents of every dollar that is “saved” in taxes by this bill accrues, not to the middle class or small business owners, but to the wealthy and large corporations. There is no evidence that greater wealth at the top will trickle down to the rest of us in the form of new well-paying jobs.

Furthermore, the deficit will grow exponentially under this bill, starving our government of revenue to fund crucial public services, like quality education, which are necessary to sustain a stable democracy.

Please tell your senators to vote no on this bill. Then call people you know in other states whose senators might be persuaded to vote no, and ask them to do the same.

Elaine Fronhofer

Amherst