×

Easthampton Troop 205 member Logan Hunt earns Eagle Scout

  • Easthampton Boy Scout Troop 205 Eagle Scout Logan Hunt says the Eagle Scout pledge with Scoutmaster David Bernier on Sunday at the Easthampton Community Center. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Easthampton Boy Scout Troop 205 Eagle Scout Logan Hunt receives the Eagle Scout neckerchief from his father, David Hunt, Sunday at the Easthampton Community Center. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Easthampton Boy Scout Troop 205 Scoutmaster David Bernier, left, shakes hands with Eagle Scout Logan Hunt as his parents, David and Kim Hunt, applaud Sunday at the Easthampton Community Center. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Kim Hunt, mother of Easthampton Boy Scout Troop 205 Eagle Scout Logan Hunt, pins the Eagle Scout badge to his uniform Sunday at the Easthampton Community Center. His father, David Hunt, looks on. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Easthampton Boy Scout Troop 205 Eagle Scout Logan Hunt, right, pins a mentor pin to the uniform of Erik Bernier, assistant scoutmaster, Sunday at the Easthampton Community Center. Connor Strong, left, was the master of ceremonies. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • State Sen. Don Humason speaks during a ceremony held for Easthampton Eagle Scout Logan Hunt, right, Sunday at the Easthampton Community Center. Connor Strong, left, was the master of ceremonies. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • State Sen. Don Humason presents Easthampton Eagle Scout Logan Hunt with a citation on Sunday, July 16, 2017, at the Easthampton Community Center. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS

  • Eagle Scout Logan Hunt installed this life ring buoy and emergency alarm at Nashawannuck Pond in Easthampton, as part of his Eagle Scout project. GAZETTE STAFF/JERREY ROBERTS



@JackSuntrup
Sunday, July 16, 2017

EASTHAMPTON — In the Boy Scout world, there is the story of Eagle Mountain.

A young Scout starts at a trailhead and heads up the mountain’s rugged path. At some points, he hikes fast. At others, he takes his time. Sometimes he stops to catch his breath. His friends begin to turn around, one by one, along the way. They don’t make it. But the young Scout persists up the mountain, making it to the summit.

The boy, by then a young man, looks out to many more mountains — representing the challenges in life which face us.

But on the day he finishes that climb, he looks out and simply enjoys the view.

On Sunday, that was Logan Hunt, an 18-year-old Scout from Easthampton’s Troop 205. His troop minted him an Eagle Scout, a culmination of years of work.

Only 5 percent of Boy Scouts ever work their way to Eagle Scout, according to the National Eagle Scout Association. Hunt was the only one from his Cub Scout den to earn the honor.

“It’s satisfying,” Hunt said of his accomplishment, “but, I don’t know how to describe it, it’s kind of sad in a way, that some people just lost the drive for it.”

To earn Eagle, Hunt had to earn 21 merit badges (he recorded 28), advance through various ranks, and finally lead his fellow scouts in an Eagle Scout project, something that would provide a lasting benefit to the community.

In Hunt’s case, he sought out donations to install two buoys equipped with an alarm system at Nashawannuck Pond in Easthampton. If there is a distressed swimmer, removing a buoy from its stand will send a message to emergency crews.

The emergency alarm is also designed to prevent theft.

“I would really like to thank Peaceful Pools and Spas, the Oxbow Marina and the Easthampton Parks and Rec department,” he said. “If it wasn’t for them I wouldn’t have been able to do my Eagle Scout project.”

Hunt joins his older brother Tyler as an Eagle Scout. His father, David, was also a Boy Scout.

At the end of the court of honor Sunday, state Sen. Don Humason presented Hunt with a citation from the Massachusetts State Senate.

Humason said society needs Scouts “to step up — to try to do what you can for your community, for your state, for your country.”

“It was a hard course,” Humason said, “at a time when you could’ve been doing other things.”

Hunt’s parents, David and Kimberly, were also recognized at the court of honor.

Hunt’s next mountain?

He will be attending Florida Atlantic University in the fall, where he is planning to study business and finance.