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Book Bag: Books by Sarah Rees Brennan; Jay Conrad Levinson and Shel Horowtiz; and Daniel Czitrom


Thursday, April 14, 2016

 TELL THE WIND AND FIRE

By Sarah Rees Brennan

Clarion Books/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

sarahreesbrennan.com

 Sarah Rees Brennan, who writes fantasy books for young adults, invokes a bit of Charles Dickens — particularly in the opening line — in “Tell the Wind and Fire,” a tale of a divided New York City where magic reigns. One half of the city is known as Light, in which luxury and opulence is the norm; in the Dark section there’s terrible poverty, anger and dangerous magic.

The story’s narrator, Lucie Manette, was born in the Dark part of the city, but through various schemes she’s built a life in the Light section, winning celebrity status and a rich boyfriend, Ethan. But when the Light police arrest Ethan for treason, Lucie discovers he has a secret of his own: a doppleganger, Carwyn, from the Dark part of the city that looks just like him.

When revolution erupts in the city between the forces of Light and Dark, more secrets — and plenty of blood — are spilled, and Lucie no longer knows whom to trust, or whether she can save either boy.

Sarah Rees Brennan will read from "Tell the Wind and Fire,” and join fellow fantasy and YA writer Holly Black, for a discussion Saturday at 4 p.m. at the Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley.

 

GUERRILLA MARKETING TO HEAL THE WORLD: COMBINING PRINCIPLE AND PROFIT TO CREATE THE WORLD WE WANT

By Jay Conrad Levinson and Shel Horowitz

Morgan James Publishing

greenandprofitable.com

 Writer, marketing consultant and environmental activist Shel Horowitz has long combined his interests to focus on books and workshops that demonstrate how businesses can be profitable while also protecting the planet. In his 2010 book, “Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green,” co-written with the late Jay Conrad Levinson, Horowitz, of Hadley, outlined numerous ways businesses could be successful while also “doing the right thing” environmentally.

In this new book, the authors profile successful companies that have done just that. But they also focus on ways businesses can be profitable by creating products that not only advance social change and environmental protection, but which the company can successfully market.

One example is Dean’s Beans of Orange, which gets all its coffee and cocoa from organic, fair-trade farms, ensuring coffee growers an above-market price for their produce; the company also funds village-led community development projects in the countries from which it buys coffee beans.

“This book is designed to redefine what the business world thinks is possible,” Horowitz writes in an introduction, “and to show through hundreds of powerful examples that not only can we succeed by baking our values into our business practices, the path of success is noticeably easier.”

Shel Horowitz will talk about "Guerrilla Marketing to Heal the World” Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley.

 

NEW YORK EXPOSED: THE GILDED AGE
POLICE SCANDAL THAT LAUNCHED THE PROGRESSIVE ERA

By Daniel Czitrom

Oxford University Press

www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/facultyprofiles/daniel_czitrom

 Aside from being the largest and most densely populated city in America in the 1890s, New York City might have been its most corrupt; it was firmly in the grip of a political cabal known as Tammany Hall that worked closely with a brutal police force to maintain power through bribery, extortion and legalized vice.

In “New York Exposed,” Daniel Czitrom, a professor of history at Mount Holyoke College, examines the years when a public backlash against this corruption arose. It was led at first by Charles H. Parkhurst, a prominent minister who in a fiery sermon in early 1892 denounced the city’s leaders as “a lying, perjured, rum-soaked, and libidinous lot.”

Challenged by those officials to prove his accusations or face a libel charge, Parkhurst spent two years in disguise visiting brothels, saloons and other seedy places, and his findings forced the New York State Senate to investigate the city’s police department. Some 700 people would testify before a special commission, revealing the shocking brutality of police and their prominent role in supporting — and benefiting from — the vice economy.

Czitrom argues that the investigation, which forced the resignation of numerous cops and politicians, essentially kick-started the nation’s Progressive political movement. His book profiles a wealth of colorful characters: sinister but slick Police Superintendent Thomas Byrnes; anarchist Emma Goldman; zealous prosecutor John. W. Goff; and Theodore Roosevelt, who became head of the city’s Police Commission and vowed to clean up the force.

Daniel Czitrom will read from “New York Exposed” Thursday at 7 p.m. at the Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley.